Monthly Archives: March 2012

Bob Dylan: Bob Dylan (1962)




ON THIS DATE (50 YEARS AGO)
MARCH 19, 1962 – Bob Dylan: Bob Dylan is released
# ALL THINGS MUSIC PLUS+ 4/5
# Allmusic 4/5

Bob Dylan is the debut album by Bob Dylan, released on this date in March 1962 on Columbia Records. It features folk standards, plus two original compositions, and was produced by Columbia’s legendary talent scout John H. Hammond, who signed Dylan to the label.

Dylan met John Hammond at a rehearsal session for Carolyn Hester on September 14, 1961, at the apartment shared by Hester and her then-husband, Richard Fariña. Hester had invited Dylan to the session as a harmonica player, and Hammond approved him as a session player after hearing him rehearse, with recommendations from his son, musician John Hammond Jr., and from Liam Clancy.

Hammond later told Robert Shelton that he decided to sign Dylan “on the spot,” and invited him to the Columbia offices for a more formal audition recording. No record of that recording has turned up in Columbia’s files, but Hammond, Dylan, and Columbia’s A&R director Mitch Miller have all confirmed that an audition took place. (Producer Fred Catero, then a recording engineer for Columbia Records, claims to have the master of that session. It is not the original demo for Columbia, but a session from December 6, 1962, recorded by John Hammond, Sr..)

On September 26, Dylan began a two-week run at Gerde’s Folk City, second on the bill to The Greenbriar Boys. On September 29, an exceptionally favorable review of Dylan’s performance appeared in the New York Times. The same day, Dylan played harmonica at Hester’s recording session at Columbia’s Manhattan studios. After the session, Hammond brought Dylan to his offices and presented him with Columbia’s standard five-year contract for previously unrecorded artists. Dylan signed immediately.

That night at Gerdes, Dylan told Shelton about Hammond’s offer, but asked him to “keep it quiet” until the contract’s final approval had worked its way through the Columbia hierarchy. The label’s official approvals came quickly.

Studio time was scheduled for late November, and during the weeks leading up to those sessions, Dylan began searching for new material even though he was already familiar with a number of songs. According to Dylan’s friend Carla Rotolo, “He spent most of his time listening to my records, days and nights. He studied the Folkways Anthology of American Folk Music, the singing of Ewan MacColl and A.L. Lloyd, Rabbit Brown’s guitar, Guthrie, of course, and blues…his record was in the planning stages. We were all concerned about what songs Dylan was going to do. I remember clearly talking about it.”

The album was ultimately recorded in three short afternoon sessions on November 20 and 22. Hammond later joked that Columbia spent “about $402” to record it, and the figure has entered the Dylan legend as its actual cost. Despite the low cost and short amount of time, Dylan was still difficult to record, according to Hammond. “Bobby popped every p, hissed every s, and habitually wandered off mike,” recalls Hammond. “Even more frustrating, he refused to learn from his mistakes. It occurred to me at the time that I’d never worked with anyone so undisciplined before.”

Seventeen songs were recorded, and five of the album’s chosen tracks were actually cut in single takes (“Baby Let Me Follow You Down,” “In My Time of Dyin’,” “Gospel Plow,” “Highway 51 Blues,” and “Freight Train Blues”) while the master take of “Song for Woody” was recorded after one false start. The album’s four outtakes were also cut in single takes. During the sessions, Dylan refused requests to do second takes. “I said no. I can’t see myself singing the same song twice in a row. That’s terrible.”

REVIEW
by Bruce Eder, allmusic

Bob Dylan’s first album is a lot like the debut albums by the Beatles and the Rolling Stones — a sterling effort, outclassing most, if not all, of what came before it in the genre, but similarly eclipsed by the artist’s own subsequent efforts. The difference was that not very many people heard Bob Dylan on its original release (originals on the early-’60s Columbia label are choice collectibles) because it was recorded with a much smaller audience and musical arena in mind. At the time of Bob Dylan’s release, the folk revival was rolling, and interpretation was considered more important than original composition by 

most of that audience. A significant portion of the record is possessed by the style and spirit of Woody Guthrie, whose influence as a singer and guitarist hovers over “Man of Constant Sorrow” and “Pretty Peggy-O,” as well as the two originals here, the savagely witty “Talkin’ New York” and the poignant “Song to Woody”; and it’s also hard to believe that he wasn’t aware of Jimmie Rodgers and Roy Acuff when he cut “Freight Train Blues.” But on other songs, one can also hear the influences of Bukka White, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blind Willie Johnson, and Furry Lewis, in the playing and singing, and this is where Dylan departed significantly from most of his contemporaries. Other white folksingers of the era, including his older contemporaries Eric Von Schmidt and Dave Van Ronk, had incorporated blues in their work, but Dylan’s presentation was more in your face, resembling in some respects (albeit in a more self-conscious way) the work of John Hammond, Jr., the son of the man who signed Dylan to Columbia Records and produced this album, who was just starting out in his own career at the time this record was made. There’s a punk-like aggressiveness to the singing and playing here. His raspy-voiced delivery and guitar style were modeled largely on Guthrie’s classic ’40s and early-’50s recordings, but the assertiveness of the bluesmen he admires also comes out, making this one of the most powerful records to come out of the folk revival of which it was a part. Within a year of its release, Dylan, initially in tandem with young folk/protest singers like Peter, Paul & Mary and Phil Ochs, would alter the boundaries of that revival beyond recognition, but this album marked the pinnacle of that earlier phase, before it was overshadowed by this artist’s more ambitious subsequent work. In that regard, the two original songs here serve as the bridge between Dylan’s stylistic roots, as delineated on this album, and the more powerful and daringly original work that followed. One myth surrounding this album should also be dispelled here — his version of “House of the Rising Sun” here is worthwhile, but the version that was the inspiration for the Animals’ recording was the one by Josh White.



TRACKS:
Side one
1 You’re No Good (Jesse Fuller) 1:40
2 Talkin’ New York (Bob Dylan) 3:20
3 In My Time of Dyin’ (trad. arr. Dylan) 2:40
4 Man of Constant Sorrow (trad. arr. Dylan) 3:10
5 Fixin’ to Die (Bukka White) 2:22
6 Pretty Peggy-O (trad. arr. Dylan) 3:23
7 Highway 51 (Curtis Jones) 2:52

Side two
1 Gospel Plow (trad. arr. Dylan) 1:47
2 Baby, Let Me Follow You Down (trad. arr. Eric von Schmidt) 2:37
3 House of the Risin’ Sun (trad. arr. Dave Van Ronk) 5:20
4 Freight Train Blues (trad., Roy Acuff) 2:18
5 Song to Woody (Bob Dylan) 2:42
6 See That My Grave Is Kept Clean (Blind Lemon Jefferson) 2:43

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Mott The Hoople: Wildlife (1971)



ON THIS DATE (41 YEARS AGO)

MARCH 19, 1971 – Mott The Hoople: Wildlife is released
# ALL THINGS MUSIC PLUS+ 4.5/5
# Allmusic 4/5
# Rolling Stone (see original review below)
Wildlife is the third album by Mott the Hoople. It was originally released in 1971; in the UK by Island Records (catalogue number ILPS 9144) and in the US by Atlantic Records (cat. no. SD 8382). After the edgier rock of their first two albums this record has a softer feel (leading to its nickname “Mildlife” among band members). Even Ian Hunter’s trio of compositions is introspective, though disarmingly beautiful. For the first (and only) time Mick Ralphs’ contributions predominate, leading to an almost country-rock feel.
For its second album, 1970’s Wildlife, Mott the Hoople moved away from the tipsy, Blonde on Blonde-like reels of the band’s self-titled debut, into a more standard, bluesy hard-rock sound not unlike that of Joe Cocker and the Band. Of course, the glam era heralded by the 1972 hit “All the Young Dudes” was still a ways away, but Wildlife has its own unpretentious charms. The opening “Whiskey Women” chugs along genially and “Angel of Eighth Avenue” is one of Ian Hunter’s trademark creepy ballads. The remainder of the album continues in the vein of these opening two tracks, with Hunter’s barrelhouse piano trading licks with Mick Ralph’s chunky guitar and Verdun Allen’s Garth Hudson-like organ as the rhythm section of Dale “Buffin” Griffin and Pete “Overend” Watts powers along.

‘Wildlife’ was released by Island Records on 19th March 1971 in a gatefold sleeve. (At an early stage the album was to have been titled ‘Original Mixed Up Mott’.) It entered the UK album charts on the 17th April, where it stayed for two weeks, peaking at number 44. The album’s inner gatefold was a live colour photo of Mott The Hoople from the Croydon show, while the front and back of the album was another colour photo of the band looking windswept and interesting in woodland up in County Durham. I guess the concept, if there was one, was that both photos showed ‘wildlife’ in its natural habitat. Following the release of the album, the band quickly returned to what they knew best – the road. Although a couple of the quieter songs from ‘Wildlife’ were included in the set, they were very soon replaced by newer, harder edged material. Again, there was that strange paradox: live, the band was a huge success, playing to sell-out venues all over the country. The stage was set for the recording of what was to become Mott The Hoople’s swansong for Island Records, the flawed but essential ‘Brain Capers’.

ORIGINAL ROLLING STONE REVIEW
The outcome of the battle has yet to be conclusively determined, but my scorecard gives the race for “The Most Beloved Rock And Roll Band in All the English Isles” to Mott The Hoople by two full lengths over Free.
On this, their third album, they apparently feel sure enough of themselves to venture away from the piano/organ dominated sound which initially distinguished them (and invited all those Dylan comparisons). Instead we hear the country overtones of “It Must Be Love” and “Original Mixed-Up Kid.” While this move (in light of all that has come since that first acidhead stumbled upon Johnny Cash At Folsom Prison) might seem to play on some familiar pretensions, our boys have both the taste and knowledge to keep their experiments in the proper perspective. So both the aforementioned songs, although comparatively thin-sounding, are well played and pleasant enough in a loosely relatable Mott The Hoople context.

More important, they’ve found new ways to arrange their instruments and the effects are felt throughout the album. The driving toughness of guitarist Mick Ralphs, as previously seen in “Rock And Roll Queen” and “Thunderstruck Ram,” has mellowed some. His “Whiskey Women” elucidates the band’s new approach at its best: a lighter touch but just as powerful a punch. Yet despite this change in attack (most often seen in the use of acoustic guitars), they still produce a remarkably full sound, traceable to their staunch musical intelligence: when they add additional instruments they do not merely pour them over the existing sound (a common rock pitfall), but alter that sound to accommodate them.

“Angel Of Eighth Avenue” finds the haunting melancholia of pianist Ian Hunter’s ballad style at its most convincing. (Hunter, it will be remembered, was the man around whom the early Dylan associations were inevitably focused.) His emeryboard voice, which has a nasty habit of faltering under the strain of the up-tempo, is infinitely better suited to the slower paced delivery which songs like this demand. And the country influence so obvious on side two is better acknowledged in things such as “Angel,” where the fusion is subtle and engaging in a neighborhood Hopple devotees will find more familiar.
But lest the whole affair get weighed down with self-importance, a problem which threatened the first two albums, they’ve thrown in a couple of change-of-pace surprises. Closing out side one is an energetic rendition of Melanie (!) Safka’s “Lay Down” and, the cut’s musical excellence aside, it feels good just to hear this kind of an emotional breakout from Mott The Hoople. The second, ten live minutes of “Keep A’ Knockin” which concludes the album with some two-fisted rock and roll, is the stuff of which their English reputation was made; they remind me more than a little of the early Who.

Now that they have apparently captured the British crown, isn’t it about time they were given a shot on this side of the Atlantic? There is more than enough solid music on this album to warrant it. Take side one and the live cut for their well defined and satisfying brand of rock, and then make up your own mind about the country experiments on side two. And fear not; Mott the Hoople has clearly gone beyond any Dylan comparison you might have heard. Ah, had only Dylan this much fresh energy …
~ Ben Edmonds (June 10, 1971)
TRACKS:
“Whiskey Women” (Mick Ralphs) – 3.42
“Angel of Eighth Avenue” (Ian Hunter) – 4.33
“Wrong Side of The River” (Ralphs) – 5.19
“Waterlow” (Hunter) – 3.03
“Lay Down” (Melanie Safka) – 4.13
“It Must Be Love” (Ralphs) – 2.24
“Original Mixed-Up Kid” (Hunter) – 3.40
“Home Is Where I Want To Be” (Ralphs) – 4.11
“Keep a Knockin’ (Live)” (Richard Penniman) – 10.10 (*)
(*) This track is a rock and roll medley that, besides of Keep A Knockin’, it includes snippets of a) I Got A Woman, b) What I’d Say and c) Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On.
2003 CD bonus tracks
“It’ll Be Me” (Clement) – 2.58
“Long Red” (West/Pappalardi/Ventura/Landsberg) – 3.47

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The Joshua Tree – 25 Years After





ON THIS DATE (25 YEARS AGO)

March 9, 1987 – U2: The Joshua Tree is released.
# ALL THINGS MUSIC PLUS+ 5/5
# Allmusic 5/5
# Rolling Stone (see original review below)
The Joshua Tree is the fifth studio album by U2. It was produced by Daniel Lanois and Brian Eno, and was released on 9 March 1987 on Island Records. In contrast to the ambient experimentation of their 1984 release The Unforgettable Fire, U2 aimed for a harder-hitting sound on The Joshua Tree within the limitation of strict song structures. The album is influenced by American and Irish roots music and depicts the band’s love-hate relationship with the United States, with socially and politically conscious lyrics embellished with spiritual imagery.
Inspired by American tour experiences, literature, and politics, U2 chose America as a theme for the record. Recording began in January 1986 in Ireland, and to foster a relaxed, creative atmosphere, the group recorded in two houses, in addition to two professional studios. Several events during the sessions helped shape the conscious tone of the album, including the band’s participation in A Conspiracy of Hope tour, the death of roadie Greg Carroll, and lead vocalist Bono’s travels to Central America. Recording was completed in November and additional production continued into January 1987. Throughout the sessions, U2 sought a “cinematic” quality for the record that would evoke a sense of location, in particular, the open spaces of America. They represented this in the sleeve photography depicting them in American desert landscapes.

The album received critical acclaim, topped the charts in over 20 countries, and sold in record-breaking numbers. According to Rolling Stone, the album increased the band’s stature “from heroes to superstars”. It produced the hit singles “With or Without You”, “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For”, and “Where the Streets Have No Name”. The album won Grammy Awards for Album of the Year and Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal in 1988. The group supported the record with the successful Joshua Tree Tour. Frequently cited as one of the greatest albums in rock history, The Joshua Tree is one of the world’s all-time best-selling albums, with over 25 million copies sold. In 2007, U2 released a 20th anniversary remastered edition of the record.
Before The Joshua Tree, U2 had released four studio albums and were an internationally successful band, particularly as a live act having toured every year in the 1980s. The group’s stature and the public’s anticipation for a new album grew following their 1984 record The Unforgettable Fire, their subsequent tour, and their participation in Live Aid in 1985. U2 began writing new material in mid-1985 following the Unforgettable Fire Tour.
Band manager Paul McGuinness recounted that The Joshua Tree originated from the band’s “great romance” with the United States, as the group had toured the country for up to five months per year in the first half of the 1980s. In the lead up to the album sessions, lead vocalist Bono had been reading the works of American writers such as Norman Mailer, Flannery O’Connor, and Raymond Carver so as to understand, in the words of Hot Press editor Niall Stokes, “those on the fringes of the promised land, cut off from the American dream”. Following a 1985 humanitarian visit to Ethiopia with his wife Ali, Bono said, “Spending time in Africa and seeing people in the pits of poverty, I still saw a very strong spirit in the people, a richness of spirit I didn’t see when I came home… I saw the spoiled child of the Western world. I started thinking, ‘They may have a physical desert, but we’ve got other kinds of deserts.’ And that’s what attracted me to the desert as a symbol of some sort.”

In 1985, Bono participated in Steven Van Zandt’s anti-apartheid Sun City project and spent time with Keith Richards and Mick Jagger. When Richards and Jagger played blues, Bono was embarrassed by his lack of familiarity with the genre, as most of U2’s musical knowledge began with punk rock in their youth in the mid-1970s. Bono realised that U2 “had no tradition”, and he felt as if they “were from outer space”. This inspired him to write the blues-influenced song “Silver and Gold”, which he recorded with Richards and Ronnie Wood. Until that time, U2 had been antipathetic towards roots music, but after spending time with The Waterboys and fellow Irish band Hothouse Flowers, they felt a sense of indigenous Irish music blending with American folk music. Nascent friendships with Bob Dylan, Van Morrison and Richards encouraged U2 to look back to rock’s roots and focused Bono on his skills as a songwriter and lyricist. He explained, “I used to think that writing words was old-fashioned, so I sketched. I wrote words on the microphone. For The Joshua Tree, I felt the time had come to write words that meant something, out of my experience.”  Dylan told Bono of his own debt to Irish music, while Bono further demonstrated his interest in music traditions in his duet with Irish Celtic and folk group Clannad on the track “In a Lifetime”.
The band wanted to build on the textures of The Unforgettable Fire, but in contrast to that record’s often out-of-focus experimentation, they sought a harder-hitting sound within the limitations of stricter song structures. The group referred to this approach as working within the “primary colours” of rock music—guitar, bass, and drums. Guitarist The Edge was more interested in the European atmospherics of The Unforgettable Fire and was initially reluctant to follow the lead of Bono, who, inspired by Dylan’s instruction to “go back”, sought a more American, bluesy sound. Despite not having a consensus on musical direction, the group members agreed that they felt disconnected from the dominant synthpop and New Wave music of the time, and they wanted to continue making music that contrasted with these genres. In late 1985, U2 moved to drummer Larry Mullen, Jr.’s newly purchased home to work on material written during The Unforgettable Fire Tour. This included demos that would evolve into “With or Without You”, “Red Hill Mining Town”, “Trip Through Your Wires”, and a song called “Womanfish”. The Edge recalled it as a difficult period with a sense of “going nowhere”, although Bono was set on America as a theme for the album.

Just prior to the release of The Joshua Tree, Bono was stricken with a sudden panic that the completed album was not good enough. He contemplated calling the production plants to order a halt of the record’s pressing, but he ultimately held off.  Island Records spent over $100,000 on store displays advertising the album; President Lou Maglia called it “the most complete merchandising effort ever assembled”. The Joshua Tree was released on 9 March 1987, the first new release to be made available on the compact disc, vinyl record, and cassette tape formats on the same date. Record stores in Britain and Ireland opened at midnight to accommodate the large amount of fans who had queued outside to buy the album.

Following the release of The Joshua Tree, U2 staged the worldwide Joshua Tree Tour. It began in April 1987, and comprising 109 shows over three legs, it continued through December. The first and third legs visited the US, while the second leg toured Europe. The band had previously been more successful as a live act than as record-sellers, but The Joshua Tree elevated them to a new level of popularity. The tour sold out arenas and stadiums around the world—the first time they consistently performed at venues of that size—and it played to over 3 million people. Songs from the album became staples of the tour’s setlists, as the group regularly performed eight of the record’s eleven tracks, and the only song not to be played was “Red Hill Mining Town”.

Like their previous tours, The Joshua Tree Tour was a minimalistic, austere production, and U2 used this outlet for addressing political and social concerns. One such issue was Arizona Governor Evan Mecham’s canceling the state’s observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Throughout the tour, the group continued to explore American roots music: they collaborated with folk artist Bob Dylan, blues musician B. B. King, and Harlem’s New Voices of Freedom gospel choir; U2 also visited Graceland and Sun Studios in Memphis, where they recorded new material. These new songs and the band’s experiences on tour were documented for the 1988 Rattle and Hum album and Phil Joanou-directed motion picture.

The tour grossed $40 million, but despite its commercial success and positive reviews, U2 were dissatisfied creatively, and Bono believed they were musically unprepared for their success. Mullen said, “We were the biggest, but we weren’t the best”, and for Bono the tour was “one of the worst times of [their] musical life”. On the road, the group dealt with death threats, along with injuries that Bono sustained from performing. The band hinted that the stresses of touring led them to enjoy the “rock and roll lifestyle” they previously avoided.

ORIGINAL ROLLING STONE REVIEW
The stakes are enormous, and U2 knows it. Its last album, The Unforgettable Fire, contained “Pride (In the Name of Love),” its biggest-selling single ever, and last year the band was the musical heart of Amnesty International’s Conspiracy of Hope tour. Now, it seems, U2 is poised to rise from the level of mere platinum groups to the more rarefied air above. For a band that’s always specialized in inspirational, larger-than-life gestures – a band utterly determined to be Important – The Joshua Tree could be the big one, and that’s precisely what it sounds like.
That’s not to say that this record is either a flagrantly commercial move or another Born in the U.S.A. The Joshua Tree is U2’s most varied, subtle and accessible album, although it doesn’t contain any sure-fire smash hits. But in its musical toughness and strong-willed spirituality, the album lives up to its namesake: a hardy, twisted tree that grows in the rocky deserts of the American Southwest. A Mormon legend claims that their early settlers called the Joshua tree “the praying plant” and thought its gnarled branches suggested the Old Testament prophet Joshua pointing the way to the Promised Land. The title befits a record that concerns itself with resilience in the face of utter social and political desolation, a record steeped in religious imagery.

Since U2 emerged from Dublin in 1980 with a bracing brand of hard, emotional, guitar-oriented rock, its albums have followed a pattern. The first and third (Boy and War) were muscular and assertive, full of, respectively, youthful bravado and angry social awareness; the second and fourth studio albums (October and The Unforgettable Fire) were moody and meandering and sometimes longer on ideas than on full-fledged songs.
But The Joshua Tree isn’t an outright return to the fire of War. The band ruled that out years ago: Songs like “Sunday Bloody Sunday” and “New Year’s Day” hit with driving force on the 1983 album and subsequent tour. But U2 saw itself in danger of becoming just another sloganeering arena-rock band, so the group closed that chapter with a live record and video. The band swapped longtime producer Steve Lilly-white for Brian Eno and Daniel Lanois and, with The Unforgettable Fire, declared its intention to no longer be as relentlessly heroic.
On the new album, U2 retains Eno and Lanois, brings back Lillywhite to mix four songs and weds the diverse textures of The Unforgettable Fire to fully formed songs, many of them as aggressive as the hits on War. U2’s sonic trademarks are here: the monumental angst of Bono’s voice, the driving pulse of Adam Clayton’s bass and Larry Mullen Jr.’s drums and the careening wail of the Edge’s guitar. But for every predictably roaring anthem there’s a spare, inventively arranged tune, such as “With or Without You,” a rock & roll bolero that builds from a soothing beginning to a resounding climax.
The band still falls into some old traps: Bono’s perpetually choked-up voice can sound overwrought and self-important; some of the images (fire and rain, say) start to lose their resonance after a dozen or so uses; and “Exit,” a recited psychodrama about a killer, is awkward enough to remind you that not even Patti Smith could regularly pull off this sort of thing.

More than any other U2 album, though, The Joshua Tree has the power and allure to seduce and capture a mass audience on its own terms. Without making a show of its eclecticism, it features assertive rock (“Where the Streets Have No Name”), raw frenzy (“Bullet the Blue Sky”), delicacy (“One Tree Hill”), chugging rhythms (“I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For”) and even acoustic bluesiness (“Running to Stand Still”) – all of it unmistakably U2.
But if this is a breakthrough, it’s a grim, dark-hued one. At first, refreshingly honest, romantic declarations alternate with unsettling religious imagery. Then things get blacker. The raging, melodramatic “Bullet the Blue Sky” ties Biblical fire and brimstone with American violence overseas and at home. In the stomping, harmonicaspiked rocker “Trip Through Your Wires,” what looks like salvation could easily be evil seduction; “One Tree Hill” is a soft, haunting benediction on a U2 crew member who died in a motorcycle accident; and “Red Hill Mining Town” echoes Peter Gabriel’s “Don’t Give Up” in its unsparing look at personal relationships savaged by economic hardship – here, the aftermath of the largely unsuccessful British miners’ strike of 1984.

But for all its gloom, the album is never a heavy-handed diatribe. After the first few times through “Running to Stand Still,” for instance, you notice the remarkable music: the wholly unexpected blues slide guitar, the soft, Nebraska-style yelps, the ghostly harmonica. It sounds like a lovely, peaceful reverie – except that this is a junkie’s reverie, and when that realization hits home, the gentle acoustic lullaby acquires a corrosive power that recalls “Bad,” from the last LP.
The Joshua Tree is an appropriate response to these times, and a picture bleaker than any U2 has ever painted: a vision of blasted hopes, pointless violence and anguish. But this is not a band to surrender to defeatism. Its last album ended with a gorgeous elegy to Martin Luther King Jr.; The Joshua Tree closes with a haunting ode to other victims. “Mothers of the Disappeared” is built around desolate images of loss, but the setting is soothing and restorative – music of great sadness but also of unutterable compassion, acceptance and calm. The Unforgettable Chill, you might call this album, and unforgettable is certainly the right word.
~ STEVE POND (April 9, 1987)
TRACKS:
While the band and crew were working on the album’s mixing, Lillywhite’s wife, singer Kirsty MacColl, volunteered to set the running order for the album. The band told her to put “Where the Streets Have No Name” first and “Mothers of the Disappeared” last, with the rest sequenced according to her preference.
All lyrics written by Bono, all music composed by U2.
Side one
1.            “Where the Streets Have No Name”       5:38
2.            “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For”        4:38
3.            “With or Without You”  4:56
4.            “Bullet the Blue Sky”      4:32
5.            “Running to Stand Still”                 4:18
Side two
6.            “Red Hill Mining Town”                  4:54
7.            “In God’s Country”          2:57
8.            “Trip Through Your Wires”           3:33
9.            “One Tree Hill”                  5:23
10.          “Exit”     4:13
11.          “Mothers of the Disappeared”                  5:12

BONUS CD

The bonus audio CD features 14 additional tracks, including the B-sides “Luminous Times (Hold on to Love)”, “Walk to the Water”, “Spanish Eyes”, “Deep in the Heart”, “Silver and Gold”, “Sweetest Thing”, and “Race Against Time”. Two versions of “Silver and Gold” are included—the B-side version, and the original recording from the Sun City album, with Keith Richards and Ron Wood. The edited single version of “Where the Streets Have No Name” appears on the bonus CD. “Beautiful Ghost/Introduction to Songs of Experience” features lyrics from the introduction of William Blake’s Songs of Experience, and was previously released in The Complete U2 digital box set in 2004. “Wave of Sorrow (Birdland)”, “Desert of Our Love”, “Rise Up”, and “Drunk Chicken/America” are all previously unreleased recordings from The Joshua Tree sessions. “Wave of Sorrow (Birdland)” is a completed version of the demo “Birdland”, and “Drunk Chicken/America” features an excerpt of Allen Ginsberg’s recitation of his poem, “America”.

TRACKS:                              
All written by U2 except noted                                 
1              Luminous Times (Hold on to Love)           (U2, Eno)             4:35
2              Walk to the Water                           4:49
3              Spanish Eyes                      3:16
4              Deep in the Heart                            4:31
5              Silver and Gold                  (Bono)  4:38
6              Sweetest Thing                                 3:05
7              Race Against Time                           4:03
8              Where the Streets Have No Name (single edit)                  4:50
9              Silver and Gold (Sun City)             (Bono)  4:43
10           Beautiful Ghost/Introduction to Songs of Experience      (U2, William Blake)          3:50
11           Wave of Sorrow (Birdland)                          4:06
12           Desert of Our Love                          4:59
13           Rise Up                                 4:08
14           Drunk Chicken/America                (U2, Allen Ginsberg)       1:31

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Fillmore East

ON THIS DATE (47 YEARS AGO)
March 8, 1968 – Fillmore East opened in New York City.

The Fillmore East was rock promoter Bill Graham’s rock venue on Second Avenue near East 6th Street in the East Village neighborhood of the Manhattan borough of New York City. It was open from 1968 to 1971, and featured some of the biggest acts in rock music at the time. The Fillmore East was a companion to Graham’s Fillmore Auditorium, and its successor, the Fillmore West, in San Francisco, Graham’s home base.

The venue provided Graham with an East Coast counterpart to his existing Fillmore in San Francisco, California. Opening on March 8, 1968, the Fillmore East quickly became known as “The Church of Rock and Roll,” with two-show, triple-bill concerts several nights a week. Graham would regularly alternate acts between the East and West Coast venues. Until early 1971, bands were booked to play two shows per night, at 8 pm and 11 pm, on both Friday and Saturday nights.

Because of changes in the music industry and exponential growth in the concert industry, Graham closed the Fillmore East. Its final concert took place on June 27, 1971, with the billed acts: The Allman Brothers Band, The J. Geils Band, Albert King, and special guests – Edgar Winter’s White Trash, Mountain, The Beach Boys, and Country Joe McDonald – in an invitation-only performance. The concert was broadcast live by WNEW-FM with between-set banter by many of the station’s then-trend-setting disc jockeys – Alison Steele (“The Nightbird”) and Scott Muni among them. The Allman Brothers Band set was released as the second disc of the deluxe edition/remastered version of their Eat a Peach (1972 and 2006) album.

LIVE ALBUMS
Because of the auditorium’s great acoustics, many live albums were recorded at the Fillmore East, including:

  • Duane Allman on the Fillmore East’s final weekend
  • The Allman Brothers Band – At Fillmore East (1971)
  • The Allman Brothers Band – Fillmore East, February 1970 (released 1997) on Grateful Dead Records
  • Buffalo Bob Smith – Live at Bill Graham’s Fillmore East; creator of Howdy Doody (recorded April 4, 1971)
  • The Chambers Brothers – Love, Peace and Happiness, a double album with one studio disc and one live disc recorded at Bill Graham’s Fillmore East
  • Joe Cocker – Mad Dogs and Englishmen – The Complete Fillmore East Concerts – March 27–28, 1970 (released 2006)
  • Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young – 4 Way Street (1971)
  • Miles Davis – Live at the Fillmore East, March 7, 1970: It’s About That Time (2001); recorded March 7, 1970, in a rare live recording of Davis’s so-called ‘”lost quintet”
  • Miles Davis – Miles Davis at Fillmore: Live at the Fillmore East (1970); recorded June 17–20, 1970
  • Derek and the Dominos – In Concert; recorded October 23–24, 1970 (released 1973)
  • Derek and the Dominos – Live at the Fillmore ; recorded October 23–24, 1970 (released 1994)
  • Flying Burrito Brothers – Authorized Bootleg: Fillmore East, N.Y., N.Y. Late Show, Nov. 7, 1970 (CD, Feb-2011, Hip-O Select)
  • Virgil Fox/Heavy Organ – Bach Live at Fillmore East ; recorded Dec. 1, 1970 (released on LP 1971, on CD 1989)
  • The Fugs – Golden Filth – Alive at the Fillmore East ; recorded June 1, 1968 (released on LP 1970, on CD as part of the Rhino Handmade 3 CD set, Electromagnetic Steamboat 2003)
  • Grateful Dead – Ladies and Gentlemen… The Grateful Dead: Fillmore East – April 1971 (2000) ; a four-disc set taken from their five-night stint at the Fillmore East in April 1971
  • Grateful Dead – Live at the Fillmore East 2-11-69 (1997)
  • Grateful Dead – History of the Grateful Dead, Volume One (Bear’s Choice) (February 13–14, 1970) (1973)
  • Grateful Dead – Dick’s Picks Volume Four – Grateful Dead Fillmore East 2/13–14/70 (1996) ; a three-disc set released on Grateful Dead Records
  • Grateful Dead – Road Trips Volume 3 Number 3 Fillmore East 5-15-70 ; a three-disc set with a bonus fourth disc included with early orders of the set from dead.net; (released 2010)
  • Jimi Hendrix – Band of Gypsys (1970) and Live at the Fillmore East (1999)
  • Lorin Hollander – Lorin Hollander at the Fillmore East ; recorded Feb. 23, 1969
  • Humble Pie – Performance Rockin’ the Fillmore (1971)
  • Iron Butterfly – Fillmore East 1968 ; a two disc set recorded on April 26 & 27, 1968; released by Rhino Entertainment 2011.
  • Jefferson Airplane – Bless Its Pointed Little Head (1969)  ; this album was split between the Fillmore East and Fillmore West.
  • Jefferson Airplane – Live at the Fillmore East (recorded 1969; released 1998)
  • Jefferson Airplane – Sweeping Up the Spotlight: Jefferson Airplane Live at the Fillmore East 1969 (released 2007)
  • King Crimson – Epitaph – two-disc set with three tracks recorded at Fillmore East Nov. 21, 1969
  • King Crimson – Live at Fillmore East – one disc with both Nov. 21 and Nov. 22, 1969 partial sets (released in 2004 on The King Crimson Club label as Club 25)
  • Al Kooper & Mike Bloomfield – Fillmore East: The Lost Concert Tapes ; recorded Dec. 13–14, 1968 (released 2003)
  • Love – Studio / Live – live tracks recorded at Fillmore East (released on LP 1982, on CD 1991)
  • John Lennon and Yoko Ono – Live Jam – Side Two of this live album, which was included as a bonus album in Lennon & Ono’s Some Time in New York City (released: 1972), was recorded at the Fillmore East on June 6, 1971.
  • Taj Mahal – The Real Thing ; recorded Feb. 13, 1971 (remaster with one more track, released 2000)
  • Mountain – Flowers Of Evil – Side 2 recorded at Fillmore East, December 26, 1970
  • John Mayall – The Turning Point (1969) (released on CD 1990, remaster with three more tracks released 2001)
  • The Nice – Live at the Fillmore East December 1969 ; recorded December 19–20, 1969 (released 2009)
  • Laura Nyro – Spread Your Wings and Fly: Live at the Fillmore East (released 2004)
  • Quicksilver Messenger Service – Happy Trails; live tracks recorded at both Fillmore East & Fillmore West (CD released 1994)
  • Ten Years After – Live at the Fillmore East 1970 ; recorded February 27–28, 1970 (released 2001)
  • Johnny Winter – Live Johnny Winter And ; recorded at Fillmore East & Pirate’s World, Dania,FL
  • Johnny Winter – “Johnny Winter And: Live at the Fillmore East 10/3/70” ; (released 2010)
  • Neil Young & Crazy Horse – Live at the Fillmore East recorded March 6–7, 1970 (released on CD and DVD 2006)
  • Frank Zappa And The Mothers – Freaks And Motherfu*#@%! ; recorded in 1970 (released 1991)
  • Frank Zappa’s Mothers – Fillmore East – June 1971 (released 1971)

SHOWS

8-Mar-68 Big Brother and the Holding Company, Tim Buckley, Albert King Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
22-Mar-68 Doors, Ars Nova, Crome Syrcus Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
23-Mar-68 Doors, Ars Nova, Crome Syrcus Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
29-Mar-68 Richie Havens, Troggs, United States Of America Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
30-Mar-68 Richie Havens, Troggs, United States Of America Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
5-Apr-68 Who, Buddy Guy, Free Spirits Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
6-Apr-68 Who, Buddy Guy, Free Spirits Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
12-Apr-68 Butterfield Blues Band, Charles Lloyd, Tom Rush Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
13-Apr-68 Butterfield Blues Band, Charles Lloyd, Tom Rush Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
19-Apr-68 Mothers Of Invention, James Cotton Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows.  “Last Ny Appearance ‘Til Peace”,
20-Apr-68 Mothers Of Invention, James Cotton Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows.  “Last Ny Appearance ‘Til Peace”,
26-Apr-68 Traffic, Blue Cheer, Iron Butterfly Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
27-Apr-68 Traffic, Blue Cheer, Iron Butterfly Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
3-May-68 Jefferson Airplane, Crazy World Of Arthur Brown Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
4-May-68 Jefferson Airplane, Crazy World Of Arthur Brown Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
10-May-68 Jimi Hendrix, Sly & Family Stone Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
11-May-68 Autosalvage, Group Therapy, Joyfull Noise Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: “Groupquake”–RCA Records Free Show.  Also Playing:, Status Cymbal
17-May-68 Byrds, Tim Buckley, Foundations Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
18-May-68 Byrds, Tim Buckley, Foundations Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
24-May-68 Ravi Shankar, Alla Rakha, ,
25-May-68 Country Joe & The Fish, Blue Cheer, Pigmeat Markham Lights: Joshua Light Show,
31-May-68 Moby Grape, Fugs, Gary Burton Quartet Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
1-Jun-68 Moby Grape, Fugs, Gary Burton Quartet Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
2-Jun-68 Bill Cosby, Janice Nian, Frankie Dunlop & Maletta Lights: Light By Pablo, Notes: Also: Jazz Pantomime, Salute To Dick Gregory
5-Jun-68 Incredible String Band, , WBAI-fm Benefit,
7-Jun-68 Electric Flag, Quicksilver, Steppenwolf Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
8-Jun-68 Electric Flag, Quicksilver, Steppenwolf Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
14-Jun-68 Grateful Dead, Jeff Beck, Seventh Sons Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
15-Jun-68 Grateful Dead, Jeff Beck, Seventh Sons Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
21-Jun-68 Vanilla Fudge, James Cotton, Loading Zone Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
22-Jun-68 Georgie Fame, James Cotton, Loading Zone Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
19-Jul-68 Jefferson Airplane, H.P. Lovecraft Lights: Headlights, Notes: 2 Shows,
20-Jul-68 Jefferson Airplane, H.P. Lovecraft Lights: Headlights, Notes: 2 Shows,
2-Aug-68 Big Brother and the Holding Company, Staple Singers, Ten Years After Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
3-Aug-68 Big Brother and the Holding Company, Staple Singers, Ten Years After Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
9-Sep-68 Joan Baez, , ,
10-Sep-68 Joan Baez, , ,
13-Sep-68 Chambers Brothers, Blood Sweat And Tears, Amboy Dukes Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
14-Sep-68 Chambers Brothers, Blood Sweat And Tears, Amboy Dukes Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
20-Sep-68 Traffic, Staple Singers, Crome Syrcus Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
21-Sep-68 Traffic, Staple Singers, Crome Syrcus Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
27-Sep-68 Country Joe & Fish, Ten Years After, Procol Harum, ,
28-Sep-68 Country Joe & Fish, Ten Years After, Procol Harum, ,
4-Oct-68 Eric Burdon & The Animals, Sly & The Family Stone, Linn County Lights: Joshua Light Show,
5-Oct-68 Eric Burdon & The Animals, Sly & The Family Stone, Linn County Lights: Joshua Light Show,
11-Oct-68 Beach Boys, Creedence Clearwater Revival Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
12-Oct-68 Turtles, Creedence Clearwater Revival, New York Rock & Roll Ensemble Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
18-Oct-68 Jeff Beck, Tim Buckley, Albert King Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
19-Oct-68 Jeff Beck, Tim Buckley, Albert King Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
25-Oct-68 Moody Blues, John Mayall, Rhinoceros Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
26-Oct-68 Moody Blues, John Mayall, Rhinoceros Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
27-Oct-68 Skip James, David Peel, Happy & Artie Traum, Pete Seeger, The Pennywhistlers, John Beecher, Jerry Jeff Walker (Benefit for “Sing Out”) – not Bill Graham,
1-Nov-68 Richie Havens, Quicksilver, Mccoys Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
2-Nov-68 Richie Havens, Quicksilver, Move, The Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
8-Nov-68 Steppenwolf, Buddy Rich, Children Of God Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows Children Of God Replaced The Move Who Cancelled
9-Nov-68 Steppenwolf, Buddy Rich, Children Of God Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows Children Of God Replaced The Move Who Cancelled
15-Nov-68 Country Joe & The Fish Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows, ,
16-Nov-68 Country Joe & The Fish Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows, ,
22-Nov-68 Iron Butterfly, Canned Heat, Youngbloods Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
23-Nov-68 Iron Butterfly, Canned Heat, Youngbloods Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
27-Nov-68 Incredible String Band Lights: Joshua Light Show, ,
28-Nov-68 Jefferson Airplane, Buddy Guy, Chuck Davis Dance Co. Lights: Head, Notes: 2 Shows
29-Nov-68 Jefferson Airplane, Buddy Guy, Chuck Davis Dance Co. Lights: Head, Notes: 2 Shows
30-Nov-68 Jefferson Airplane, Buddy Guy, Chuck Davis Dance Co. Lights: Head, Notes: 2 Shows
4-Dec-68 Duke Ellington, New York R ‘N R Ensemble, Notes: Benefit For Oddysey House, ,
5-Dec-68 H. Rap Brown/ Bernadine Dohrn, Herbert Marcuse, Carl Oglesby/ Pete Seger, Notes: “Radical Perspectives” Benefit For The Guardian Newspaper,
6-Dec-68 Country Joe & The Fish, Fleetwood Mac, Kusama’s Self-obliteration Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
7-Dec-68 Country Joe & The Fish, Fleetwood Mac, Kusama’s Self-obliteration Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
13-Dec-68 Sam & Dave Review, Super-Session, Earth Opera Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: Super-Session w/ Mike Bloomfield & Al Kooper
14-Dec-68 Sam & Dave Review, Super-Session, Earth Opera Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: Super-Session w/ Mike Bloomfield & Al Kooper
20-Dec-68 Creedence Clearwater Revival, Deep Purple, James Cotton Blues Band Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
21-Dec-68 Creedence Clearwater Revival, Deep Purple, James Cotton Blues Band Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
27-Dec-68 Butterfield Blues Band, Crazy World Of Arthur Brown, Super Session / Sweetwater Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: Also: Sweetwater.  Super Session Includes Bloomfield,, Kooper, And Friends.  2 Shows
28-Dec-68 Butterfield Blues Band, Crazy World Of Arthur Brown, Super Session / Sweetwater Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: Also: Sweetwater.  Super Session Includes Bloomfield,, Kooper, And Friends.  2 Shows
29-Dec-68 Walter Carlos / Ars Nova, Good Earth / Amer. Brass Quintet, Ny R N’ R Ensemble / Ny Elec St. Ensemble Lights: Light By Pablo, Notes: “An Eclectic Christmas” By George F. Schutz Musical, Coordinator, John Eckert
31-Dec-68 Chambers Brothers, Mother Earth Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
10-Jan-69 B.B. King, Winter w/ Johnny Winter, Terry Reid Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows.
11-Jan-69 B.B. King, Winter w/ Johnny Winter, Terry Reid Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows.
17-Jan-69 Buddy Rich, Grass Roots, Spirit Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows.
18-Jan-69 Buddy Rich, Grass Roots, Spirit Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows.
24-Jan-69 Blood Sweat & Tears, Jethro Tull, Gay Deperados Steel Band Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows: Gay Deperados Steel Band Replaced, Savoy Brown Blues Band
25-Jan-69 Blood Sweat & Tears, Jethro Tull, Gay Deperados Steel Band Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows: Gay Deperados Steel Band Replaced, Savoy Brown Blues Band
31-Jan-69 Iron Butterfly, Led Zepplin, Porter’s Popular Preachers Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows The Move Replaced By Perf #3
1-Feb-69 Iron Butterfly, Led Zepplin, Porter’s Popular Preachers Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows The Move Replaced By Perf #3
7-Feb-69 Canned Heat, Pentangle, Rhinoceros Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
8-Feb-69 Canned Heat, Pentangle, Rhinoceros Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
11-Feb-69 Janis Joplin, Grateful Dead Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
12-Feb-69 Janis Joplin, Grateful Dead Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
14-Feb-69 Sam & Dave, Winter, Aorta Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows.  Winter Replaces Small Faces. Sam & Dave Replaced, Jeff Beck
15-Feb-69 Chuck Berry, Winter, Savoy Brown; Aorta Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows.  Winter Replaces Small Faces. Chuck Berry Replaces, Jeff Beck
21-Feb-69 Mothers Of Invention, Buddy Miles Express, Chicago Transit Authority Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
22-Feb-69 Mothers Of Invention, Buddy Miles Express, Chicago Transit Authority Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
28-Feb-69 Ten Years After, John Mayall, Slim Harpo Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
1-Mar-69 Ten Years After, John Mayall, Slim Harpo Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
7-Mar-69 Buffy Sainte-Marie, Ian & Sylvia, Great Speckeled Bird, ,
8-Mar-69 Vanilla Fudge, Amboy Dukes, Sirocco Lights: Light By Pablo,
14-Mar-69 Procol Harum, Pacific Gas & Electricity, Collectors, The Lights: Light By Pablo,
15-Mar-69 Procol Harum, Pacific Gas & Electricity, Collectors, The Lights: Light By Pablo,
21-Mar-69 Creedence Clearwater Revival, Spirit, Aynsley Dunbar Retaliation Lights: Light By Pablo,
22-Mar-69 Creedence Clearwater Revival, Spirit, Aynsley Dunbar Retaliation Lights: Light By Pablo,
28-Mar-69 Steppenwolf, Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger And The Trinity, John Hammond Lights: Light By Pablo, Notes: 2 Shows. Also: John Hammond
29-Mar-69 Steppenwolf, Julie Driscoll, Brian Auger And The Trinity, John Hammond Lights: Light By Pablo, Notes: 2 Shows Also: John Hammond
4-Apr-69 Chambers Brothers, Hello People, Elephant’s Memory Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
5-Apr-69 Chambers Brothers, Hello People, Elephant’s Memory Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
9-Apr-69 Ten Years After, Nice, The, Family Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
10-Apr-69 Ten Years After, Nice, The, Family Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
11-Apr-69 Blood Sweat And Tears, Jethro Tull; Albert King, AUM Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows: Albert King Replaces Jethro Tull On Late Show
12-Apr-69 Blood Sweat And Tears, Savoy Brown, AUM Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Show: Savoy Brown Replaces Jethro Tull
18-Apr-69 Butterfield Blues Band, Foundations, Savoy Brown Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
19-Apr-69 Butterfield Blues Band, Foundations, Savoy Brown Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
25-Apr-69 Joni Mitchell, James Cotton, Taj Mahal Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
26-Apr-69 Joni Mitchell, James Cotton, Taj Mahal Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
27-Apr-69 Incredible String Band Lights: Joshua Light Show, ,
2-May-69 Jeff Beck, Joe Cocker & The Grease Band, NRBQ Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
3-May-69 Jeff Beck, Joe Cocker & The Grease Band, NRBQ Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
8-May-69 Country Joe and the Fish, Children of God, Hello People, Benefit National Emergency Civil Liberties Committee,
9-May-69 Band, The, Cat Mother & Allnight Newsboys Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
16-May-69 Who, Sweetwater, It’s A Beautiful Day Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows There Was A Fire At The Store On The Corner, And The Building Had To Be Evacuated During The Who’s, Performance.  Later They Were Arrrested For Obstructing
17-May-69 Who, Sweetwater, It’s A Beautiful Day Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
18-May-69 Who, Sweetwater, It’s A Beautiful Day, ,
23-May-69 Sly & The Family Stone, Clarence Carter, Rotary Connection Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
24-May-69 Sly & The Family Stone, Clarence Carter, Rotary Connection Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
29-May-69 Led Zeppelin, Woody Herman & His Orchestra, Delaney & Bonnie Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
30-May-69 Led Zeppelin, Woody Herman & His Orchestra, Delaney & Bonnie Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
31-May-69 Led Zeppelin, Woody Herman & His Orchestra, Delaney & Bonnie Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
6-Jun-69 Chuck Berry, Albert King Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
7-Jun-69 Chuck Berry, Albert King Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
13-Jun-69 Mother of Invention, Youngbloods, Chicago Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
14-Jun-69 Mothers Of Invention, Youngbloods, Chicago Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
20-Jun-69 Grateful Dead, Buddy Miles Express Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
21-Jun-69 Grateful Dead, Buddy Miles Express Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
3-Jul-69 Jeff Beck Group, Jethro Tull, Soft White Underbelly, ,
8-Aug-69 Jefferson Airplane, Joe Cocker & Grease Band, Spontaneous Sound Lights: Glen McKay’s Head Lights,
9-Aug-69 Jefferson Airplane, Joe Cocker & Grease Band, Spontaneous Sound Lights: Glen McKay’s Head Lights,
26-Sep-69 Country Joe & The Fish, Grateful Dead, Sha Na Na Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
27-Sep-69 Country Joe & The Fish, Grateful Dead, Sha Na Na Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
3-Oct-69 Chuck Berry, John Mayall, Elvin Bishop Group Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
4-Oct-69 Chuck Berry, John Mayall, Elvin Bishop Group Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
10-Oct-69 Vanilla Fudge, Dr. John The Night Tripper Lights: Joshua Light Show, ,
11-Oct-69 Vanilla Fudge, Dr. John The Night Tripper Lights: Joshua Light Show, ,
17-Oct-69 Spirit, Kinks, Bonzo Dog Band Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
18-Oct-69 Spirit, Kinks, Bonzo Dog Band Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
20-Oct-69 Who, King Crimson, AUM Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: The Who Perform “Tommy”
21-Oct-69 Who, King Crimson, AUM Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: The Who Perform “Tommy”
22-Oct-69 Who, King Crimson, AUM Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: The Who Perform “Tommy”
23-Oct-69 Who, King Crimson, AUM Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: The Who Perform “Tommy”
24-Oct-69 Who, King Crimson, AUM Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: The Who Perform “Tommy”
25-Oct-69 Who, King Crimson, AUM Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: The Who Perform “Tommy”
28-Oct-69 Tuesday Night Jam, Notes: “Tuesday Night Auditions And Jams” Advertised At Least, Through End Of Year, ,
31-Oct-69 Mountain, Steve Miller Blues Band, Move, The [Replacing the Steve Baron Quartet] Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
1-Nov-69 Mountain, Steve Miller Blues Band, Move, The [Replacing the Steve Baron Quartet] Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
7-Nov-69 Santana, Butterfield Blues Band, Humble Pie / It’s A Beautiful Day Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
8-Nov-69 Santana, Butterfield Blues Band, Humble Pie / It’s A Beautiful Day Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
14-Nov-69 Johnny Winter, Chicago, Blodwyn Pig Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
15-Nov-69 Johnny Winter, Chicago, Blodwyn Pig Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
21-Nov-69 Joe Cocker & His Grease Band, Fleetwood Mac, King Crimson/ Voices Of East Harlem Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: Voices Of East Harlem Perform At Late Show
22-Nov-69 Joe Cocker & His Grease Band, Fleetwood Mac, King Crimson/ Voices Of East Harlem Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: Voices Of East Harlem Perform At Late Show
26-Nov-69 Jefferson Airplane, Youngbloods, Joseph Eger’s Crossover Lights: Headlights, Notes: 2 Shows
28-Nov-69 Jefferson Airplane, Youngbloods, Joseph Eger’s Crossover Lights: Headlights, Notes: 2 Shows
29-Nov-69 Jefferson Airplane, Youngbloods, Joseph Eger’s Crossover Lights: Headlights, Notes: 2 Shows
5-Dec-69 Jethro Tull, Grand Funk Railroad, Fat Mattress Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
6-Dec-69 Jethro Tull, Grand Funk Railroad, Fat Mattress Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
12-Dec-69 Richie Havens, Nina Simone Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
13-Dec-69 Richie Havens, Nina Simone Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
14-Dec-69 Incredible String Band Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: Produced With Jay K. Hoffman, ,
19-Dec-69 Byrds, Nice, Sons Of Champlin Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows. Dion At Late Show
20-Dec-69 Byrds, Nice, Sons Of Champlin Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows. Dion At Late Show
26-Dec-69 Blood Sweat And Tears, Appaloosa, Allman Brothers Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
27-Dec-69 Blood Sweat And Tears, Appaloosa, Allman Brothers Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
28-Dec-69 Blood Sweat And Tears, Appaloosa, Allman Brothers Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
1-Jan-70 Jimi Hendrix, Voices Of East Harlem Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
2-Jan-70 Grateful Dead, Lighthouse, Cold Blood Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
3-Jan-70 Grateful Dead, Lighthouse, Cold Blood Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
9-Jan-70 Ike & Tina Turner, Mongo Santamaria, Fats Domino Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
10-Jan-70 Ike & Tina Turner, Mongo Santamaria, Fats Domino Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
16-Jan-70 Santana, Catfish Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
17-Jan-70 Santana, Catfish Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
23-Jan-70 Quicksilver, Country Joe & The Fish, Eric Mercury Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
24-Jan-70 Quicksilver, Country Joe & The Fish, Eric Mercury Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
30-Jan-70 Mountain, Jack Bruce & Friends Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
31-Jan-70 Mountain, Jack Bruce & Friends Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
6-Feb-70 Delaney, Bonnie & Friends, Wilbert Harrison, Seals And Crofts Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows.  D+B Play With Eric Clapton
7-Feb-70 Delaney, Bonnie & Friends, Wilbert Harrison, Seals And Crofts Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows.  D+B Play With Eric Clapton
11-Feb-70 Grateful Dead, Allman Brothers, Love Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
13-Feb-70 Grateful Dead, Allman Brothers, Love Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
14-Feb-70 Grateful Dead, Allman Brothers Love Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
20-Feb-70 Savoy Brown, Kinks, Renaissance / Noonan Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
21-Feb-70 Savoy Brown, Kinks, Renaissance / Noonan Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
22-Feb-70 Ravi Shankar, Notes: w/ Zakir Quereshi – Tabla, Dr. Ashoka Ray – Tambora, Pro. w/Jay K. Hoffman,
26-Feb-70 Ten Years After, Zephyr, John Hammond Lights: Joshua Light Show,
27-Feb-70 Ten Years After, Doug Kershaw, Zephyr Lights: Joshua Light Show,
28-Feb-70 Ten Years After, Doug Kershaw, Zephyr Lights: Joshua Light Show,
6-Mar-70 Neil Young & Crazy Horse, Steve Miller Blues Band, Miles Davis Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
7-Mar-70 Neil Young & Crazy Horse, Steve Miller Blues Band, Miles Davis Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
13-Mar-70 John Mayall, B.B. King, Taj Mahal Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
14-Mar-70 John Mayall, B.B. King, Taj Mahal Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
15-Mar-70 John Mayall, Taj Mahal, Leon Thomas Lights: Joshua Light Show,
19-Mar-70 Moody Blues, Lee Michaels, Argent Lights: Joshua Light Show,
20-Mar-70 Moody Blues, Lee Michaels, Argent Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
21-Mar-70 Moody Blues, Lee Michaels, Argent Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
27-Mar-70 Joe Cocker Mad Dogs & Englishmend, Ronnie Hawkins, Stone The Crows Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows Ronnie Hawkins Replaced Brian Auger And The, Trinity
28-Mar-70 Joe Cocker Mad Dogs & Englishmend, Ronnie Hawkins, Stone The Crows Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows Ronnie Hawkins Replaced Brian Auger And The, Trinity
3-Apr-70 Quicksilver Messenger Service, Van Morrison’s Orchestra, Brinsley Schwarz Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
4-Apr-70 Quicksilver Messenger Service, Van Morrison’s Orchestra, Brinsley Schwarz Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
5-Apr-70 Tom Paxton, Fraser & Debolt Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: Produced With Jay K. Hoffman, Paxton Accomp. By David, Horowitz
10-Apr-70 Santana, It’s A Beautiful Day, American Dream Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows American Dream Replaced Free
11-Apr-70 Santana, It’s A Beautiful Day, American Dream Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows American Dream Replaced Free
12-Apr-70 Santana, It’s A Beautiful Day, American Dream Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows American Dream Replaced Free
17-Apr-70 Ray Charles, Dizzy Gillespie, Mongo Santamaria Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
18-Apr-70 Ray Charles, Dizzy Gillespie, Mongo Santamaria Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows
23-Apr-70 Incredible String Band, Stone Monkey Mime Troupe, Notes: “U”-A Pop Pantomime.  Produced With Jay K. Hoffman.,
24-Apr-70 Incredible String Band, Stone Monkey Mime Troupe, Notes: “U”-A Pop Pantomime.  Produced With Jay K. Hoffman., 2 Shows,
25-Apr-70 Incredible String Band, Stone Monkey Mime Troupe, Notes: “U”-A Pop Pantomime.  Produced With Jay K. Hoffman., 2 Shows,
26-Apr-70 Incredible String Band, Stone Monkey Mime Troupe, Notes: “U”-A Pop Pantomime.  Produced With Jay K. Hoffman.,
1-May-70 Mountain, Blodwyn Pig Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
2-May-70 Mountain, Blodwyn Pig Lights: Joshua Light Show, Notes: 2 Shows,
6-May-70 Jefferson Airplane, Manfred Mann: Chapter 3 Lights: Headlights, Notes: 2 Shows Moved From 4/28-29/70, Wilbert Harrison
7-May-70 Jefferson Airplane, Manfred Mann: Chapter 3 Lights: Headlights, Notes: 2 Shows Moved From 4/28-29/70,
8-May-70 Mothers Of Invention, Insect Trust, Sea Train Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows The Nice Cancelled
9-May-70 Mothers Of Invention, Insect Trust, Sea Train Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows The Nice Cancelled
10-May-70 Music Festival ’70, Notes: Satellite Colorcast From London 3pm Live, 8pm Delayed Prod w/ Jay K. Hoffman, ,
15-May-70 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Joe’s Lights, ,
16-May-70 Guess Who, Cold Blood, Buddy Miles Lights: Joe’s Lights,
21-May-70 Jethro Tull, Clouds, John Sebastian Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
22-May-70 Jethro Tull, Clouds, John Sebastian Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
23-May-70 Jethro Tull, Clouds, John Sebastian Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
29-May-70 Nina Simone, Mongo Santamaria Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows,
30-May-70 Nina Simone, Mongo Santamaria Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows,
2-Jun-70 Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Taylor & Reeves, ,
3-Jun-70 Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Taylor & Reeves, ,
4-Jun-70 Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Taylor & Reeves, ,
5-Jun-70 Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Taylor & Reeves, ,
6-Jun-70 Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Taylor & Reeves, ,
7-Jun-70 Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Taylor & Reeves, ,
10-Jun-70 Traffic, Fairport Convention, Mott The Hoople Lights: Joe’s Lights,
11-Jun-70 Traffic, Fairport Convention, Mott The Hoople Lights: Joe’s Lights,
12-Jun-70 Procol Harum, Rhinoceros, Seals & Crofts Lights: Joe’s Lights,
13-Jun-70 Procol Harum, Rhinoceros, Seals & Crofts Lights: Joe’s Lights,
17-Jun-70 Laura Nyro, Miles Davis Quintet, ,
18-Jun-70 Laura Nyro, Miles Davis Quintet, ,
19-Jun-70 Laura Nyro, Miles Davis Quintet, ,
20-Jun-70 Laura Nyro, Miles Davis Quintet, ,
24-Jun-70 Ten Years After, Illinoise Speed Press Lights: Pig Light Show, ,
25-Jun-70 Ten Years After, Illinoise Speed Press Lights: Pig Light Show, ,
26-Jun-70 Chicago, Blodwyn Pig, Jerry Hahn Brotherhood Lights: Pig Light Show,
27-Jun-70 Chicago, Blodwyn Pig, Jerry Hahn Brotherhood Lights: Pig Light Show,
9-Jul-70 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Pig Light Show, Notes: Midnight Show,
10-Jul-70 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Pig Light Show, Notes: Midnight Show,
11-Jul-70 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Pig Light Show, Notes: Midnight Show,
11-Jul-70 Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Notes: 8pm Show, ,
12-Jul-70 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Pig Light Show, Notes: Midnight Show,
12-Jul-70 Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Notes: 8pm Show, ,
24-Jul-70 Hot Tuna, Leon Russell, Rig Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
25-Jul-70 Hot Tuna, Leon Russell, Rig Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
31-Jul-70 Grand Funk Railroad, Pacific Gas & Electric, Blood Rock Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
1-Aug-70 Grand Funk Railroad, Pacific Gas & Electric, Blood Rock Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
5-Aug-70 Jethro Tull, Cactus Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows,
8-Aug-70 Small Faces w/ Rod Stewart, Blodwyn Pig, Chicken Shack Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
10-Aug-70 Santana, Voices Of East Harlem, Ball ‘N Jack Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
11-Aug-70 Santana, Voices Of East Harlem, Ball ‘N Jack Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
12-Aug-70 Santana, Voices Of East Harlem, Ball ‘N Jack Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
14-Aug-70 Procol Harum, Country Joe McDonald, Toe Fat Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows Seals & Crofts Replaced By Toe Fat
15-Aug-70 Procol Harum, Country Joe McDonald, Toe Fat Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows Seals & Crofts Replaced By Toe Fat
21-Aug-70 Youngbloods, Blues Image, Tim Hardin Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
22-Aug-70 Youngbloods, Blues Image, Tim Hardin Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
28-Aug-70 Savoy Brown, Fleetwood Mac, Fairport Convention Lights: Pig,
29-Aug-70 Savoy Brown, Fleetwood Mac, Fairport Convention Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
11-Sep-70 Byrds, Delaney & Bonnie & Friends, Great Jones Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
12-Sep-70 Byrds, Delaney & Bonnie & Friends, Great Jones Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
17-Sep-70 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Joe’s Lights, ,
18-Sep-70 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Joe’s Lights, ,
19-Sep-70 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Joe’s Lights, ,
20-Sep-70 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Joe’s Lights, ,
23-Sep-70 Allman Brothers, Van Morrison, Byrds Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: “Welcome To Fillmore East” Also: Elvin Bishop, Flock,, Albert King, Sha Na Na
25-Sep-70 Steve Miller Band, Mungo Jerry, Clouds Lights: Captain Candlepower, Notes: 2 Shows
26-Sep-70 Steve Miller Band, Mungo Jerry, Clouds Lights: Captain Candlepower, Notes: 2 Shows
27-Sep-70 Pink Floyd, Notes: 2 Shows. Produced With Jay K. Hoffman, ,
2-Oct-70 Johnny Winter, Buddy Miles, Tin House, Notes: 2 Shows,
3-Oct-70 Johnny Winter, Buddy Miles, Tin House, Notes: 2 Shows,
9-Oct-70 John Mayall, It’s A Beautiful Day, Flock Lights: Captain Candlepower, Notes: 2 Shows
10-Oct-70 John Mayall, It’s A Beautiful Day, Flock Lights: Captain Candlepower, Notes: 2 Shows
12-Oct-70 Rock Relics Auction, , ,
16-Oct-70 B.B. King, Butterfield Blues Band, Elvin Bishop Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
17-Oct-70 B.B. King, Butterfield Blues Band, Elvin Bishop Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
23-Oct-70 Derek & The Dominos, Ball ‘N Jack, Humble Pie Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows Humble Pie Replaced Juicy Lucy
24-Oct-70 Derek & The Dominos, Ball ‘N Jack, Humble Pie Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows Humble Pie Replaced Juicy Lucy
30-Oct-70 Lee Michaels, Cactus, Juicy Lucy Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
31-Oct-70 Lee Michaels, Cactus, Juicy Lucy Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
6-Nov-70 Albert King, N Y Rock N’ Roll Ensemble, Flying Burrito Brothers Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows Mountain Canc.
7-Nov-70 Albert King, N Y Rock N’ Roll Ensemble, Flying Burrito Brothers Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows Mountain Canc.
10-Nov-70 Rod Stewart & Small Faces, Black Sabbath, If Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
13-Nov-70 Frank Zappa & Mothers Of Invention, Sha Na Na, JF Murphy & Free Flowing Salt, Notes: 2 Shows, Joni Mitchell sang with the Mothers at the late show
14-Nov-70 Frank Zappa & Mothers Of Invention, Sha Na Na, JF Murphy & Free Flowing Salt, Notes: 2 Shows,
18-Nov-70 Traffic, Cat Stevens, Hammer Lights: Joe’s Lights,
19-Nov-70 Traffic, Cat Stevens, Hammer Lights: Joe’s Lights,
20-Nov-70 Leon Russell, Elton John, Mckendree Spring Lights: Captain Candlepower, Notes: 2 Shows
21-Nov-70 Leon Russell, Elton John, Mckendree Spring Lights: Captain Candlepower, Notes: 2 Shows
25-Nov-70 Jefferson Airplane, Buddy Guy-Jr. Wells Band Lights: Headlights, Notes: 2 Shows,
27-Nov-70 Jefferson Airplane, Buddy Guy-Jr. Wells Band Lights: Headlights, Notes: 2 Shows,
28-Nov-70 Jefferson Airplane, Buddy Guy-Jr. Wells Band Lights: Headlights, Notes: 2 Shows,
29-Nov-70 Incredible String Band, Notes: Prod. In Association w/ Jay K. Hoffman, ,
4-Dec-70 Kinks, Love w/ Arthur Lee, Quatermass Lights: Joe’s Lights,
5-Dec-70 Kinks, Love w/ Arthur Lee, Quatermass Lights: Joe’s Lights,
11-Dec-70 Canned Heat, Allman Brothers, Dreams / Toe Fat Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows , Toe Fat Late Shows Only
12-Dec-70 Canned Heat, Allman Brothers, Dreams / Toe Fat Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows , Toe Fat Late Shows Only
14-Dec-70 Virgil Fox Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: “Richard Torrence Presents Heavy Organ”, ,
18-Dec-70 Savoy Brown, Poco, Gypsy / Jo Mama Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows.  Jo Mama Performed At Late Show Only
19-Dec-70 Savoy Brown, Poco, Gypsy / Jo Mama Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows.  Jo Mama Performed At Late Show Only
22-Dec-70 Laura Nyro, Jackson Browne, ,
23-Dec-70 Laura Nyro, Jackson Browne, ,
24-Dec-70 Laura Nyro, Jackson Browne, ,
26-Dec-70 Mountain, Mylon, David Rea Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
27-Dec-70 Mountain, Mylon, David Rea Lights: Joe’s Lights,
30-Dec-70 Mountain, Mylon, David Rea Lights: Joe’s Lights,
31-Dec-70 Mountain, Mylon, David Rea Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
8-Jan-71 Buddy Miles, Big Brother and the Holding Company & Holding Co., Sweetwater Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
9-Jan-71 Buddy Miles, Big Brother and the Holding Company, Sweetwater Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
15-Jan-71 Hot Tuna (electric), Taj Mahal, Brethren, Notes: 2 Shows,
16-Jan-71 Hot Tuna (electric), Taj Mahal, Brethren, Notes: 2 Shows,
22-Jan-71 Dave Mason & Cass Elliot, Odetta, Livingston Taylor, Notes: 2 Shows,
23-Jan-71 Dave Mason & Cass Elliot, Odetta, Livingston Taylor, Notes: 2 Shows,
25-Jan-71 James Taylor, Victoria, Notes: 2 Shows.  “Special Charity Performances”, ,
29-Jan-71 Spirit, Blood Rock, Cowboy Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
30-Jan-71 Spirit, Blood Rock, Cowboy Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
5-Feb-71 Steppenwolf, Ten Wheel Drive w/ Genya Ravan, Luther Allison, Notes: 2 Shows,
6-Feb-71 Steppenwolf, Ten Wheel Drive w/ Genya Ravan, Luther Allison, Notes: 2 Shows,
11-Feb-71 Taj Mahal, Roberta Flack, Leon Thomas, ,
12-Feb-71 Chambers Brothers, Taj Mahal, Spencer Davis & Peter Jameson, ,
13-Feb-71 Chambers Brothers, Taj Mahal, Spencer Davis & Peter Jameson, ,
16-Feb-71 Small Faces, Savoy Brown w/ Kim Simmonds, Grease Band Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
17-Feb-71 Small Faces, Savoy Brown w/ Kim Simmonds, Grease Band Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
19-Feb-71 Black Sabbath, J. Geils Band, Sir Lord Baltimore Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
20-Feb-71 Black Sabbath, J. Geils Band, Sir Lord Baltimore Lights: Pig, Notes: 2 Shows
26-Feb-71 Fleetwood Mac, Van Morrison, Freeway Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
27-Feb-71 Fleetwood Mac, Van Morrison, Freeway Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: 2 Shows
28-Feb-71 Gordon Lightfoot, Happy & Artie TrAUM, ,
5-Mar-71 Quicksilver Mess Service, Eric Burdon & War, War, ,
6-Mar-71 Quicksilver Mess Service, Eric Burdon & War, War, ,
11-Mar-71 Johnny Winter And, Allman Brothers, Elvin Bishop, ,
12-Mar-71 Johnny Winter, Allman Brothers, Elvin Bishop, ,
13-Mar-71 Johnny Winter, Allman Brothers, Elvin Bishop, ,
18-Mar-71 Astrology Now, , ,
19-Mar-71 Cactus, Humble Pie, Dada Lights: Pig,
20-Mar-71 Cactus, Humble Pie, Dada Lights: Pig,
21-Mar-71 Spring For Lowenstein, George Segal, MC, Notes: Benefit: Theo Bikel, Dick Benjamin, Jim Bouton, Betty, Comdon, Ben Gazzara, Barry Grey, Adolph Green, Buck, Henry, Tom Lehrer, Mitch Miller, Phyliss Newman, Jerry, Orbach, Tricia O'[neill, Paula Prentiss, Scott Jarvis(1776),, Stiller & Meara, Robert Vaughn, Peter Yarrow, Cast Of
26-Mar-71 Richie Havens, Mark/Almond, Paul Siebel / Michael Grando, Notes: Michael Grando On Late Show Only,
27-Mar-71 Richie Havens, Mark/Almond, Paul Siebel / Michael Grando, Notes: Michael Grando On Late Show Only,
1-Apr-71 Santana, Tower Of Power, Rahsaan Roland Kirk & Vibration Society Lights: Joe’s Lights,
2-Apr-71 Santana, Tower Of Power, Rahsaan Roland Kirk & Vibration Society Lights: Joe’s Lights,
3-Apr-71 Santana, Tower Of Power, Rahsaan Roland Kirk & Vibration Society Lights: Joe’s Lights,
4-Apr-71 Howdy Doody Revival, w/ Buffalo Bob Smith, ,
5-Apr-71 Humble Pie (replacing Jethro Tull), Edgar Winter’s White Trash, Tin House Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: Also Cactus
6-Apr-71 Humble Pie (replacing Jethro Tull), Edgar Winter’s White Trash, Tin House Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: Also Cactus
8-Apr-71 Elton John, Sea Train, Wishbone Ash, ,
9-Apr-71 Elton John, Sea Train, Wishbone Ash, ,
10-Apr-71 Elton John, Sea Train, Wishbone Ash, ,
12-Apr-71 Mountain, Mylon, T. Rex Lights: Joe’s Lights,
13-Apr-71 Mountain, Mylon, T. Rex Lights: Joe’s Lights,
14-Apr-71 Mountain, Mylon, T. Rex Lights: Joe’s Lights,
15-Apr-71 Mountain, Mylon, T. Rex Lights: Joe’s Lights,
16-Apr-71 John Mayall, Boz Scaggs, Randall’s Island Lights: Joe’s Lights,
17-Apr-71 John Mayall, Boz Scaggs, Randall’s Island Lights: Joe’s Lights,
20-Apr-71 Ten Years After, J. Geils Band Lights: Joe’s Lights, ,
21-Apr-71 Elton John, James Taylor, Richie Havens, ,
23-Apr-71 Procol Harum, Winter Consort, Teegarden & Van Winkle Lights: Joe’s Lights,
24-Apr-71 Procol Harum, Winter Consort, Teegarden & Van Winkle Lights: Joe’s Lights,
25-Apr-71 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Joe’s Lights, ,
26-Apr-71 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Joe’s Lights, ,
27-Apr-71 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Joe’s Lights, ,
28-Apr-71 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Joe’s Lights, ,
29-Apr-71 Grateful Dead, New Riders Of The Purple Sage Lights: Joe’s Lights, ,
30-Apr-71 Emerson Lake & Palmer, Edgar Winter’s White Trash, Curved Air, ,
1-May-71 Emerson Lake & Palmer, Edgar Winter, Curved Air, ,
4-May-71 Jethro Tull, Cowboy Lights: Pig, ,
5-May-71 Jethro Tull, Cowboy Lights: Pig, ,
7-May-71 Poco, Linda Ronstadt, Manhattan Transfer Lights: Pig,
8-May-71 Poco, Linda Ronstadt, Manhattan Transfer Lights: Pig,
14-May-71 Free, Mott The Hoople, Mandrill Lights: Pig, Notes: Adv. Says Delaney & Bonnie
15-May-71 Free, Mott The Hoople, Mandrill Lights: Pig, Notes: Adv. Says Delaney & Bonnie
20-May-71 Leon Russell, Taj Mahal, J.f. Murphy & Salt Lights: Joe’s Lights,
21-May-71 Leon Russell, Taj Mahal, Donny Hathaway Lights: Joe’s Lights,
22-May-71 Leon Russell, Taj Mahal, Donny Hathaway Lights: Joe’s Lights,
23-May-71 Leon Russell, Taj Mahal, Donny Hathaway Lights: Joe’s Lights,
28-May-71 Lee Michaels, Humble Pie, Fanny Lights: Joe’s Lights,
29-May-71 Lee Michaels, Humble Pie, Fanny Lights: Joe’s Lights,
30-May-71 Laura Nyro, Spencer Davis & Peter Jameson, ,
5-Jun-71 Frank Zappa & Mothers Of Invention, Hampton Grease Band, Head Over Heels, ,
6-Jun-71 Frank Zappa & Mothers Of Invention, Hampton Grease Band, Head Over Heels, ,
9-Jun-71 Byrds, Mckendree Spring, Eric Anderson, , Notes: Elton John turned up and played a few songs after the late show.
11-Jun-71 Blood Rock, Alice Cooper, Glass Harp Lights: Pig,
12-Jun-71 Blood Rock, Alice Cooper, Glass Harp Lights: Pig,
18-Jun-71 B.B. King, Moby Grape, Grootna Lights: Joe’s Lights,
19-Jun-71 B.B. King, Moby Grape, Grootna Lights: Joe’s Lights,
24-Jun-71 Johnny Winter And, Edgar Winter’s White Trash, Notes: Program Has Johnny Winter, ,
25-Jun-71 Allman Brothers, J. Geils Band, Albert King Lights: Joe’s Lights,
26-Jun-71 Allman Brothers, J. Geils Band, Albert King Lights: Joe’s Lights,
27-Jun-71 Allman Brothers, J. Geils Band, Albert King Lights: Joe’s Lights, Notes: Also: Country Joe McDonald, Edgar Winter’s White Trash, Mountain, Beach Boys. Last Show At Fillmore East

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Miles Davis: Relaxin’ with The Miles Davis Quintet

MARCH 1958 (54 YEARS AGO)
Miles Davis: Relaxin’ with The Miles Davis Quintet is released

# ALL THINGS MUSIC PLUS+ 5/5
# Allmusic 5/5

Relaxin’ with The Miles Davis Quintet is an album recorded in 1956 by Miles Davis and released in March, 1958. Two sessions on 11 May 1956 and 26 October in the same year resulted in four albums—this one, Steamin’ with The Miles Davis Quintet, Workin’ with The Miles Davis Quintet and Cookin’ with the Miles Davis Quintet. These four albums are considered to be one of the best performances for the whole hard bop subgenre.
Relaxin’ with the Miles Davis Quintet is in every way a masterpiece. When the trumpeter (1926-1991) had formed the band in 1955, his colleagues—tenor saxophonist John Coltrane, pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones—were not considered jazz-world A-listers. And before conquering his narcotics addiction earlier in the Fifties, Davis had seen his once-promising career go into eclipse. By 1956, however, his sound, especially when muted, was an achingly personal counterpart to the vocals of Billie Holiday and Frank Sinatra. Relaxin’ (plus its Prestige companions, Miles, Cookin’, Workin’, and Steamin’) reestablished Davis, and elevated his quintet as the gold standard of small groups.
With its accent on bright tempos, from medium-bounce to crisply up, Relaxin’ remains one of Davis’s sunniest outings, a prime example of one of the outstanding ensembles of the 20th century reaching the summit of their artistry.

PERSONNEL:
Miles Davis – trumpet
John Coltrane – tenor saxophone
Red Garland – piano
Paul Chambers – bass
Philly Joe Jones – drums
LINER NOTES
Those of you who own the album Cookin’ With The Miles Davis Quintet know, from reading the back liner that they recorded nineteen other extended tracks at the sessions which produced the five numbers heard on Cookin’.
On that same liner, I stated that the Miles Davis Quintet was, to me and many others, the group in modern jazz but that they had broken up in the spring of 1957.
Since the disbanding Miles has fronted three different groups. In the summer of 1957, retaining Red Garland and Paul Chambers, he completed the personnel with Sonny Rollins and Arthur Taylor. It was not that each musician was not wonderful but Rollins was not contributing to the group feeling; he was longing for one of his own where he could express himself the way he wanted to.
In the fall Miles re-organized once more. Bobby Jaspar, on tenor and flute, replaced Rollins, Tommy Flanagan was at the piano bench instead of Garland and Philly Joe returned in place of Taylor. Again there were better than good performances but not the Miles Davis Quintet. Jaspar, a more than capable tenorman, did not fit with the spirit of the group. The flute furthered this difference.

When Miles returned from a concert tour in which Julian Adderley’s alto supplanted Jaspar’s tenor, he reformed the original quintet for a January 1958 engagement, as Garland and John Coltrane re-entered the fold, but swelled the group to sextet size by retaining Adderley. Cannonball is a case of another fine musician, separate from either Rollins or Jaspar, who does not fit with the Miles Davis group. Then again, it has not been a long association for him and Coltrane certainly didn’t belong with Miles when he first joined the group. This, however, was due to undeveloped skills rather than lack of coinciding musical temperament. Rollins could have fit easily if he so chose; Jaspar, however modern, is in another idiom and Adderley is of yet another persuasion.
How long the sextet, or quintet, if it should revert to that number, will stay intact is purely speculative at this writing. On this depends whether the group will recapture and maintain the consistent brilliance they were radiating during 1956. Coltrane, further enriched by the experience of playing with Thelonious Monk during the summer of 1957, has increased both his immediate importance and his potential; the rhythm section has not lost any of its skill, imagination or fire; Miles, is as before, a probing, sensitive, lyrical musician who does stagnate from month to month.
Miles is a jazzman of many sides. Others imitate him as they do Bird, another fellow who had a couple or three facets to his playing, and in both cases they usually get only one aspect. Miles may be a “man walking on eggshells” but he is also a diamond cutting into opaque glass. He combines, in his astute grasp, all the important elements that make for personal, memorable jazz as expertly as the group’s individuals have molded their separate talents into one pulsing whole.
This set is called Relaxin’ because of the ballad performances in several different tempos, usual-ballad, medium and up, which flow along in an unimpeded manner. There are also the incisive swingers; Sonny Rollins’ Oleo (done previously by Miles and Sonny in Prestige 7109, Miles Davis And The Modern Jazz Giants) and Dizzy Gillespie’s Woody’n You.
Although this session was recorded in a studio, the tunes were done in the immediate succession of a nightclub-type set and there were no second takes. There is a false start on You’re My Everything and you will hear Miles’ instructions to Red Garland before the complete performance of the tune. In other instances on this record, Miles addresses the group, exchanges communications with engineer Rudy Van Gelder, jokes with Bob Weinstock, etc. These comments make this recording a bit more personal and you are thereish.

Before a note is played Miles says to Bob Weinstock, “I’ll play it and tell you what it is later.” Of course, you know that it is If I Were A Bell. Red Garland, who introduced it into the group, has done it a trio version (Prestige 7086). Miles is muted here, as he is throughout the album, excepting Woody’n You, and extremely eloquent. Coltrane is singing, and, like a bell, swinging. Garland’s extended solo is another gem.
You’re My Everything is done in ballad tempo by Miles and Trane with rich block-chords by Red setting the mood. The nuances by the rhythm section lend a welcome vitality.
For joyous, straight-ahead swinging and melodic improvisation, I Could Write A Book speaks several volumes. As in If I Were A Bell, Miles opens and closes; Trane and Red appear in between.

The three take turns in stating the theme of Oleo, an original that has become almost de rigeur for all Davis in-person appearances. Miles, in his two choruses, is backed by Chambers except on the bridges when the entire rhythm section swings into action. This is observed in Coltrane’s first chorus but beginning with the second, the full trio works behind him until near the end of his final one. With Garland’s solo the laying-out pattern is invoked again by Jones. Chambers is a rock on this, Philly’s brushes are lightning and Coltrane is at his driving best. Miles’ sure-footed tightrope walking leads back to the platform of the theme.
It Could Happen To You returns us to the lilting, swinging groove with Miles stating and embellishing the melody — Trane and Red in extremely exemplary solos on the rise and fall of the rhythm section’s tide.
Woody’n You, one of the most misspelled titles in jazz (it was written by Dizzy for Woody Herman who used to play it behind tap dancers but never recorded it), is one of the great modern jazz standards. The performance here is a high-water mark which combines intense drive with the great harmonic interest that the chord changes generate. Miles is searing and searching-finding. Coltrane, spurred on by the utilitarian absence and presence of Garland plus the general dynamics of the rhythm section, reaches the heights too. There is a story-telling, half-chorus drum solo by Philly Joe, after Miles’ second entrance, that precedes the final chorus. Miles’ arrangement leading back into the original melody in the lest eight bars is simple and beautiful.
At the end we hear Miles say, “Okay?” and Bob Weinstock, in jest, tells him to, “do that one over.” Miles asks, “Why?” but Coltrane, unconcerned, looks for the beer opener.

Recently, a critic (I won’t call his name because he made himself foolish enough in the Sunday New York Times, a far more public place than this liner) in discussing Miles Davis, stated, “the limp whispering and fumbling uncertainty that have marked much of his work with small groups have smacked more of inarticulateness than of art.”
This is the some guy who said of Charlie Parker, in discussing him on a liner for a West Coast altoist’s LP, “a tone that was, at best, erratic.”
It is bad enough to fail in foreseeing great talent but to be wrong in retrospect is tiresome and unforgivable.
~ notes by IRA GITLER
~ supervision by Bob Weinstock
~ recording by Van Gelder
TRACKS:
The first four tracks are from the October session, the other two from May.
“If I Were a Bell” (Frank Loesser) – 8:15
“You’re My Everything” (Harry Warren) – 5:18
“I Could Write a Book” (Richard Rodgers) – 5:09
“Oleo” (Sonny Rollins) – 6:18
“It Could Happen to You” (Jimmy van Heusen) – 6:37
“Woody ‘n’ You” (Dizzy Gillespie) – 5:02

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We’ll All Meet At The Station – Davy Jones Celebrated

By Tara Gellman – 03/01/2012

How do you bid farewell to someone who is part of your memories and inspirations, your laughter and your youth? By celebrating their contributions and spirit. Davy Jones may have left us in body from a heart attack on February 29, 2012, but nothing else about him is gone. Never in the history of my use of the internet have I been unable to access a web site because its’ maximum capacity had been met. On 2/29/12, however, site after site was jammed with more traffic than the 405 freeway or the Holland Tunnel at 5:30on a Friday night. THAT many people were instantly moved after learning he had died; enough to make countless sites inaccessible for hours, in fact, through the next day. So, for all of them, and for his family, friends and admirers still to come, we celebrate.


Davy Jones, born David Thomas Jones in Manchester, England on December 30, 1945, entered the realm of artists and entertainers at age eleven, landing a gig on British soap opera “Coronation Street” and later, the series “Z-Cars.” After losing his mother to emphysema when he was only fourteen, he stopped acting and began training as a jockey, having become smitten with racing quite young, an interest that always remained a vital, vibrant part of his life. Call it karma, destiny, fate, or whatever you fancy, this itself led to his casting as the Artful Dodger in “Oliver!,” first in the West End of London and later on Broadway, leading to a Tony nomination and the the singular fortune of appearing on the Ed Sullivan Show on the same night, February 9, 1964,of the Beatles’ legendary first appearance. As for fate,Jones had been apprenticing at the stables for Basil Foster, who recommended to his friend, a theatrical agent, that Jones try out for the role. As Foster told Simon Milham of UK’s Daily Mail,“there is no question he would have made a good jockey. But I didn’t think he would have the same success that he would have in show business…So I pushed him that way and I’m proud of what he achieved.”

After signing with Screen Gems, Jones made other television appearances and recorded an album for Colpix records, the same label with which Michael Nesmith was recording, using the name Michael Blessing. Produced by Screen Gems, The Monkees, the zanily unique brain child of Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider, brought Jones and Nesmith together with actor Micky Dolenz and musician Peter Tork, creating a broadly appealing show that crammed into its episodes slapstick, prop gags, psychedelia, political/social commentary, fashion, sex appeal, and, in essence, music videos. Lon Chaney, Julie Newmar, Liberace, and Ruth Buzzi are just a few of the stars who appeared on the alluringly campy and musically mesmerizing show during its too-short, two-season run from 1966 to 1968, which was enough to earn it two Emmy awards.

The series created a bona fide musical group, one whose first four albums – “The Monkees,” “More of The Monkees,” “Headquarters,” and “Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones, Ltd.” hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts – all in less than a two-year period! In 1967, they famously sold more records than the Beatles and the Stones combined. Even now, most people I know instantly start singing along to “Daydream Believer” (written by the Kingston Trio’s John Stewart) and “Last Train to Clarkesville” (Tommy Boyce/Bobby Hart), both of which were #1 hits, not to mention “Pleasant Valley Sunday” (Carole King), “I’m a Believer” (Neil Diamond) and more. With “Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones, Ltd.,” the band took control, writing and performing their own songs and releasing the first album to feature a Moog Synthesizer, a rather groundbreaking move.
It seems obligatory to mention that David Bowie is only known by that name because, while born David Robert Jones and having recorded as Davie Jones, The Monkees propelled Davy Jones to stardom, and thus name recognition, first. While Bowie has always been known as a chameleon, Jones never was one to take on a persona. He was always, lovingly, himself.

When the Monkees starred in cult classic motion picture, “Head,” the psychedelic result of a brainstorm between the Monkees, Jack Nicholson and Bob Rafelson (Nicholson and Rafelson wrote and Rafelson directed the film), the reception was not exactly warm. “Head” can’t really be described in one or two sentences, but suffice it to say the nature of Fate, destiny and free will are central to its overarching theme. “Head” reached audiences beyond those of theater-going age at the time of its release through airings by Cinemax, Turner Classic Movies and other stations, and commercial releases by RCA/Columbia, Rhino Entertainment and even Criterion. Its songs and scenes, including one between legend Frank Zappa and Jones, remain favorites to countless fans.

Jones continued to act, appearing on “Love American Style,” “My Two Dads,” “Sabrina the Teenage Witch,” “SpongeBob SquarePants,” and more. Aside from the episode where Jan whines, “Marcia, Marcia, Marcia!!!!,” the most memorable episode of “The Brady Bunch” centered on Jones, who appeared as himself, accompanying Marcia, president of his fan club, to her prom and ensuring that her character became the envy of teenage girls across the decades.
I am indeed one of those who grew up listening to and watching the Monkees, both in syndication while I was in grammar school and during MTV’s famous marathon in 1985, which caused them to explode back into current pop culture. The 1986 reunion tour brought the band, minus Nesmith, back together. Nesmith did join the last show at Los Angeles’ beautiful Greek Theater on 9/07/86. I was one of those lucky, screaming teenagers at the Greek. I got to see the men I had watched on my parents’, my own TV, ignoring my algebra homework to bounce up and down laughing and singing along to four charismatic men, wishing guys still dressed like them; whose albums my kick-ass dad had bought me on shiny new vinyl, to play on my Fisher stereo. Last year, fans got to see them on their “An Evening With The Monkees: The 45th Anniversary Tour.”Many followed Jones throughout his solo career, buying albums like “Just Me” (2001) and “She” (2009) and even bringing him into their childrens’ lives when he recorded children’s author Sandra Boynton’s “Your Personal Penguin.” He also recorded with Micky Dolenz, Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart as, appropriately, Dolenz, Jones, Boyce& Hart.

Reflecting his down-to-earth nature, Davy Jones never walked away from his first love, horse racing. Was it fate again that gave the cherubic Jones his 5’4” stature? Jones bought his first Thoroughbred in 1967 and had an amateur jockey’s license, winning his first race in February, 1996. He had the honor of exercising a horseat for trainer Burk Kessinger at the historic Churchill Downs while in Kentucky with the cast of “Grease!” He even broke his hand once jumping hurdles.  Jones owned numerous horses,at one time owning England’shistoric stable Grenville Hall, and later splitting his time between his horse farm in Snyder County, Pennsylvaniaand his home in Indiantown, Florida.

Perhaps more quietly, Jones was also a humanitarian, working for the causes of children’s educationand the fight against multiple sclerosis, supporting a camp for children with cerebral palsy and MS and establishing a multiple sclerosis research fund in honor of his niece, who sadly passed away from the same. This is just a tiny glimpse into his charity work, which also included fundraising for a local Florida community center.

He also never forgot those who had an impact on his life. Basil Foster lived in one of his homes in Florida before moving to a care facility, where Jones provided for him and spent time with the man he loved as a second father and without whom there may not have been a Monkees as we know them.
If anyone tries to minimize Davy Jones’ impact, they need only pick up a paper, turn on the television, or go online to see story after story left by friends, family, fans and, of course, by Micky Dolenz, Peter Tork and Michael Nesmith; stories of musical inspiration, teenage crushes, cinematic psychedelia, friendship, compassion and heart. Am I biased because I was and still am a fan? Maybe. Does that matter? Not a bit. As Michael Nesmith so poignantly and truthfully shared, “While it is jarring, and sometimes seems unjust, or strange, this transition we call dying and death is a constant in the mortal experience that we know almost nothing about. I am of the mind that it is a transition and I carry with me a certainty of the continuity of existence… there is an ongoing sense of life that reaches in my mind out far beyond the near horizons of mortality and into the reaches of infinity.That David has stepped beyond my view causes me the sadness that it does many of you. I will miss him, but I won’t abandon him to mortality. I will think of him as existing within the animating life that insures existence…”

So, we celebrate Davy Jones, and with fond memories flowing through us, we send love and healing to his wife and daughters, his grandchildren and all those he touched.


Davy Jones’s audition tape for The Monkees

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Pink Floyd: The Dark Side of the Moon


ON THIS DATE (39 YEARS AGO)

March 1, 1973 – Pink Floyd: The Dark Side of the Moon is released in the US.
# ALL THINGS MUSIC PLUS+ 5/5
# Allmusic 5/5
# Rolling Stone (see original review below)
The Dark Side of the Moon is the eighth studio album by Pink Floyd, released on this date in March 1973 in the US. It built on ideas explored in the band’s earlier recordings and live shows, but lacks the extended instrumental excursions that characterized their work following the departure in 1968 of founding member, principal composer and lyricist, Syd Barrett. The Dark Side of the Moon’s themes include conflict, greed, the passage of time and mental illness, the latter partly inspired by Barrett’s deteriorating mental state.

The suite was developed during live performances and was premiered several months before studio recording began. The new material was recorded in two sessions in 1972 and 1973 at Abbey Road Studios in London. The group used some of the most advanced recording techniques of the time, including multitrack recording and tape loops. Analogue synthesisers were given prominence in several tracks, and a series of recorded interviews with the band’s road crew and others provided the philosophical quotations used throughout. Engineer Alan Parsons was directly responsible for some of the most notable sonic aspects of the album, and the recruitment of non-lexical performer Clare Torry. The album’s iconic sleeve features a prism that represents the band’s stage lighting, the record’s lyrical themes, and keyboardist Richard Wright’s request for a “simple and bold” design.
The Dark Side of the Moon was an immediate success, topping the Billboard Top LPs & Tapes chart for one week. It subsequently remained in the charts for 741 weeks from 1973 to 1988, longer than any other album in history. With an estimated 50 million copies sold, it is Pink Floyd’s most commercially successful album and one of the best-selling albums worldwide. It has twice been remastered and re-released, and has been covered in its entirety by several other acts. It spawned two singles, “Money” and “Time”. In addition to its commercial success, The Dark Side of the Moon is one of Pink Floyd’s most popular albums among fans and critics, and is frequently ranked as one of the greatest rock albums of all time.

Following the release of Meddle in 1971, the band assembled for an upcoming tour of Britain, Japan, and the United States in December of that year. Rehearsing in Broadhurst Gardens in London, there was the looming prospect of a new album, although their priority at that time was the creation of new material. In a band meeting at drummer Nick Mason’s home in Camden, bassist Roger Waters proposed that a new album could form part of the tour. Waters’ idea was for an album that dealt with things that “make people mad”, focusing on the pressures faced by the band during their arduous lifestyle, and dealing with the apparent mental problems suffered by former band member Syd Barrett. The band had explored a similar idea with 1969’s The Man and The Journey. In an interview for Rolling Stone, guitarist David Gilmour said:
…I think we all thought—and Roger definitely thought—that a lot of the lyrics that we had been using were a little too indirect. There was definitely a feeling that the words were going to be very clear and specific.
Generally, all four members agreed that Waters’ concept of an album unified by a single theme was a good idea. Waters, Gilmour, Mason and Wright participated in the writing and production of the new material, and Waters created the early demo tracks at his Islington home in a small recording studio he had built in his garden shed. Parts of the new album were taken from previously unused material; the opening line of “Breathe” came from an earlier work by Waters and Ron Geesin, written for the soundtrack of The Body, and the basic structure of “Us and Them” was taken from a piece originally composed by Wright for the film Zabriskie Point. The band rehearsed at a warehouse in London owned by The Rolling Stones, and then at the Rainbow Theatre. They also purchased extra equipment, which included new speakers, a PA system, a 28-track mixing desk with four quadraphonic outputs, and a custom-built lighting rig. Nine tons of kit was transported in three lorries; this would be the first time the band had taken an entire album on tour, but it would allow them to refine and improve the new material, which by then had been given the provisional title of Dark Side of the Moon (an allusion to lunacy, rather than astronomy). However, after discovering that that title had already been used by another band, Medicine Head, it was temporarily changed to Eclipse. The new material premièred at The Dome in Brighton, on 20 January 1972, and after the commercial failure of Medicine Head’s album the title was changed back to the band’s original preference.
Dark Side of the Moon: A Piece for Assorted Lunatics, as it was then known, was performed in the presence of an assembled press on 17 February 1972—more than a year before its release—at the Rainbow Theatre, and was critically acclaimed. Michael Wale of The Times described the piece as “… bringing tears to the eyes. It was so completely understanding and musically questioning.” Derek Jewell of The Sunday Times wrote “The ambition of the Floyd’s artistic intention is now vast.” Melody Maker was, however, less enthusiastic: “Musically, there were some great ideas, but the sound effects often left me wondering if I was in a bird-cage at London zoo.”  The following tour was praised by the public. The new material was performed live, in the same order in which it would eventually be recorded, but obvious differences between the live version, and the recorded version released a year later, included the lack of synthesizers in tracks such as “On the Run”, and Bible readings that were later replaced by Clare Torry’s non-lexical vocals on “The Great Gig in the Sky”.

The band’s lengthy tour through Europe and North America gave them the opportunity to make continual improvements to the scale and quality of their performances. Studio sessions were scheduled between tour dates; rehearsals began in England on 20 January 1972, but in late February the band travelled to France and recorded music for French director Barbet Schroeder’s film, La Vallée. They then performed in Japan and returned to France in March to complete work on the film. After a series of dates in North America, the band flew to London to begin recording the album, from 24 May to 25 June. More concerts in Europe and North America followed before the band returned on 9 January 1973 to complete work on the album.
RECORDING
The album was recorded at Abbey Road Studios, in two sessions, between May 1972 and January 1973. The band were assigned staff engineer Alan Parsons, who had worked as assistant tape operator on Atom Heart Mother, and who had also gained experience as a recording engineer on The Beatles’ Abbey Road and Let It Be. The recording sessions made use of some of the most advanced studio techniques of the time; the studio was capable of 16-track mixes, which offered a greater degree of flexibility than the eight- or four-track mixes they had previously used, although the band often used so many tracks that to make more space available second-generation copies were made.

Beginning on 1 June, the first track to be recorded was “Us and Them”, followed six days later by “Money”. Waters had created effects loops from recordings of various money-related objects, including coins thrown into a food-mixing bowl taken from his wife’s pottery studio, and these were later re-recorded to take advantage of the band’s decision to record a quadraphonic mix of the album (Parsons has since expressed dissatisfaction with the result of this mix, attributed to a lack of time and the paucity of available multi-track tape recorders). “Time” and “The Great Gig in the Sky” were the next pieces to be recorded, followed by a two-month break, during which the band spent time with their families and prepared for an upcoming tour of the US. The recording sessions suffered regular interruptions; Waters, a supporter of Arsenal F.C., would often break to see his team compete, and the band would occasionally stop work to watch Monty Python’s Flying Circus on the television, leaving Parsons to work on material recorded up to that point. Gilmour has, however, disputed this claim; in an interview in 2003 he said: “We would sometimes watch them but when we were on a roll, we would get on.”
Returning from the US in January 1973, they recorded “Brain Damage”, “Eclipse”, “Any Colour You Like” and “On the Run”, while fine-tuning the work they had already laid down in the previous sessions. A foursome of female vocalists was assembled to sing on “Brain Damage”, “Eclipse” and “Time”, and saxophonist Dick Parry was booked to play on “Us and Them” and “Money”. With director Adrian Maben, the band also filmed studio footage for Pink Floyd: Live at Pompeii. Once the recording sessions were complete, the band began a tour of Europe.
ARTWORK, COVERS & OTHER THINGS
The album was originally released in a gatefold LP sleeve designed by Hipgnosis and George Hardie, and bore Hardie’s iconic dispersive prism on the cover. Hipgnosis had designed several of the band’s previous albums, with controversial results; EMI had reacted with confusion when faced with the cover designs for Atom Heart Mother and Obscured by Clouds, as they had expected to see traditional designs which included lettering and words. Designers Storm Thorgerson and Aubrey Powell were able to ignore such criticism as they were employed by the band. For The Dark Side of the Moon, Richard Wright instructed them to come up with something “smarter, neater—more classy”. The prism design was inspired by a photograph that Thorgerson had seen during a brainstorming session with Powell.


The artwork was created by their associate, George Hardie. Hipgnosis offered the band a choice of seven designs, but all four members agreed that the prism was by far the best. The design represents three elements; the band’s stage lighting, the album lyrics, and Richard Wright’s request for a “simple and bold” design. The spectrum of light continues through to the gatefold—an idea that Waters came up with.  Added shortly afterwards, the gatefold design also includes a visual representation of the heartbeat sound used throughout the album, and the back of the album cover contains Thorgerson’s suggestion of another prism recombining the spectrum of light, facilitating interesting layouts of the sleeve in record shops. The light band emanating from the prism on the album cover has six colours, missing indigo compared to the traditional division of the spectrum into red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. Inside the sleeve were two posters and several pyramid-themed stickers. One poster bore pictures of the band in concert, overlaid with scattered letters to form PINK FLOYD, and the other an infrared photograph of the Great Pyramids of Giza, created by Powell and Thorgerson.
Since the departure of founding member Barrett in 1968, the burden of lyrical composition had fallen mostly on Waters’ shoulders. He is therefore credited as the author of the album’s lyrics, making The Dark Side of the Moon the first of five consecutive Pink Floyd albums with lyrics credited only to him. The band were so confident of the quality of the writing that, for the first time, they felt able to print them on the album’s sleeve. When in 2003 he was asked if his input on the album was “organizing [the] ideas and frameworks” and David Gilmour’s was “the music”, Waters replied:
That’s crap. There’s no question that Dave needs a vehicle to bring out the best of his guitar playing. And he is a great guitar player. But the idea which he’s tried to propagate over the years that he’s somehow more musical than I am is absolute fucking nonsense. It’s an absurd notion but people seem quite happy to believe it.
RELEASE STUFF AND QUAD
As the quadraphonic mix of the album was not yet complete, the band (with the exception of Wright) boycotted the press reception held at the London Planetarium on 27 February. The guests were, instead, presented with a quartet of life-sized cardboard cut-outs of the band, and the stereo mix of the album was presented through a poor-quality public address system. Generally, however, the press were enthusiastic; Melody Maker’s Roy Hollingworth described side one as “… so utterly confused with itself it was difficult to follow”, but praised side two, writing: “The songs, the sounds, the rhythms were solid and sound, Saxophone hit the air, the band rocked and rolled, and then gushed and tripped away into the night.” Steve Peacock of Sounds wrote: “I don’t care if you’ve never heard a note of the Pink Floyd’s music in your life, I’d unreservedly recommend everyone to The Dark Side of the Moon”. In his 1973 review for Rolling Stone magazine, Lloyd Grossman declared Dark Side “a fine album with a textural and conceptual richness that not only invites, but demands involvement”.

The Dark Side of the Moon was released first in the US on 1 March 1973, and then in the UK on 24 March. It became an instant chart success in Britain and throughout Western Europe; by the following month, it had gained a gold certification in the UK and US. Throughout March 1973 the band played the album as part of their US tour, including a midnight performance at Radio City Music Hall in New York on 17 March, watched by an audience of 6,000. Highlights included an aircraft launched from the back of the hall at the end of “On the Run”, which ‘crashed’ into the stage in a cloud of orange smoke. The album reached the Billboard Top LPs & Tapes chart’s number one spot on 28 April 1973, and was so successful that the band returned two months later for another tour.
WIZARD OF OZ
Dark Side of the Rainbow and Dark Side of Oz are two names commonly used in reference to rumours circulated on the Internet since at least 1994 that The Dark Side of the Moon was written as a soundtrack for the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz. Observers playing the film and the album simultaneously have reported apparent synchronicities, such as Dorothy beginning to jog at the lyric “no one told you when to run” during “Time”, and Dorothy balancing on a tight-rope fence during the line “balanced on the biggest wave” in “Breathe”. David Gilmour and Nick Mason have both denied a connection between the two works, and Roger Waters has described the rumours as “amusing”. Alan Parsons has stated that the film was not mentioned during production of the album.
ORIGINAL ROLLING STONE REVIEW OR WHAT THEY THOUGHT OF IT LAST CENTURY
One of Britain’s most successful and long lived avante-garde rock bands, Pink Floyd emerged relatively unsullied from the mire of mid-Sixties British psychedelic music as early experimenters with outer space concepts. Although that phase of the band’s development was of short duration, Pink Floyd have from that time been the pop scene’s preeminent techno-rockers: four musicians with a command of electronic instruments who wield an arsenal of sound effects with authority and finesse. While Pink Floyd’s albums were hardly hot tickets in the shops, they began to attract an enormous following through their US tours. They have more recently developed a musical style capable of sustaining their dazzling and potentially overwhelming sonic wizzardry.
The Dark Side of the Moon is Pink Floyd’s ninth album and is a single extended piece rather than a collection of songs. It seems to deal primarily with the fleetingness and depravity of human life, hardly the commonplace subject matter of rock. “Time” (“The time is gone the song is over”), “Money” (“Share it fairly but don’t take a slice of my pie”), and “Us And Them” (“Forward he cried from the rear”) might be viewed as keys to understanding the meaning (if indeed there is any definite meaning) of The Dark Side of the Moon.

Even though this is a concept album, a number of the cuts can stand on their own. “Time” is a fine country-tinged rocker with a powerful guitar solo by David Gilmour and “Money” is broadly and satirically played with appropriately raunchy sax playing by Dick Parry, who also contributes a wonderfully-sated, breathy solo to “Us And Them.” The non-vocal “On The Run” is a standout with footsteps racing from side to side successfully eluding any number of odd malevolent rumbles and explosions only to be killed off by the clock’s ticking that leads into “Time.” Throughout the album the band lays down a solid framework which they embellish with synthesizers, sound effects and spoken voice tapes. The sound is lush and multi-layered while remaining clear and well-structured.
There are a few weak spots. David Gilmour’s vocals are sometimes weak and lackluster and “The Great Gig in the Sky” (which closes the first side) probably could have been shortened or dispensed with, but these are really minor quibbles. The Dark Side of the Moon is a fine album with a textural and conceptual richness that not only invites, but demands involvement. There is a certain grandeur here that exceeds mere musical melodramatics and is rarely attempted in rock. The Dark Side of the Moon has flash — the true flash that comes from the excellence of a superb performance.
~ Loyd Grossman, Rolling Stone, 5-24-73.
TRACKS:
All lyrics written by Roger Waters.                                           
Side one                                             
1    Speak to Me (Mason) 1:30
2    Breathe (Waters, Gilmour, Wright) 2:43
3    On the Run (Gilmour, Waters) 3:36
4    Time/”Breathe (Reprise) (Mason, Waters, Wright, Gilmour) 7:01
5    The Great Gig in the Sky (Wright, Clare Torry) 4:36
                                               
Side two                                             
1    Money (Waters) 6:22
2    Us and Them (Waters, Wright) 7:46
3    Any Colour You Like (Gilmour, Mason, Wright) 3:25
4    Brain Damage (Waters) 3:48
5    Eclipse (Waters) 2:03

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