Rush: Snakes & Arrows


ON THIS DATE (5 YEARS AGO)
May 1, 2007 – Rush: Snakes & Arrows is released.
# ALL THINGS MUSIC PLUS+ 4/5
# allmusic 4/5
Snakes & Arrows is the 18th full-length studio album by Rush, released on this date in May, 2007. Snakes & Arrows debuted at #3 on the The Billboard 200 chart where it remained for 14 weeks. It was certified gold in Canada in September 2007.] The track “Malignant Narcissism” was nominated for a Grammy Award under the category Best Rock Instrumental Performance.] The album was named as one of Classic Rock‘s 10 essential progressive rock albums of the decade.
In the five years since their last full studio album, a covers EP (2004’s Feedback) and two live releases (2003’s Rush in Rio and 2005’s R30) hardly sated the throngs of Rush fans hungry for new music. Snakes & Arrows is all they could have possibly hoped for and dreamed about. The brash, contemporary vibe of 2002’s Vapor Trails has been shed as the trio returns to the polished production and complex arrangements of their most beloved works.
Woven into the later-era Rush song stylings are no less than three instrumentals: “The Main Monkey Business” (a hard rocking full-band workout), “Hope” (a solo acoustic guitar piece written and performed by Alex Lifeson), and the humorously titled “Malignant Narcissism” (featuring Geddy Lee’s riffy, fretless electric bass and Neil Peart’s tasty drum breaks). Keyboards are few and far between on Snakes & Arrows, with erstwhile Geddy Lee collaborator Ben Mink contributing strings. Peart’s lyrics remain cerebral and poetic–challenging conventional spirituality (“Faithless” and “Armour & Sword”), examining the often troubled nature of mankind (“The Way The Wind Blows” and “The Larger Bowl”) and the frailties of communication (“Spindrift” and “Good News First”). All the elements of classic Rush are here, making perhaps the band’s finest late-career statement.
REVIEW
by Thom Jurek
When Rush issued Vapor Trails in 2002, they revealed that — even after Neil Peart’s personal tragedies in the 1990s had cast the group’s future in doubt — they were back with a vengeance. The sound was hard-hitting, direct, and extremely focused. Lyrically, Peart went right after the subject matter he was dealing with — and it was in the aftermath of 9/11 as well, which couldn’t help but influence his lyric writing. In 2004 the band issued a covers EP that was in one way a toss-off, but in another a riotous act of freewheeling joy that offered a side of the band no one had heard for 30 years. There were a couple of live offerings and a 30th anniversary project as well that kept fans happy perhaps, but broke — though Rush in Rio was the kind of live album every band hopes to record. Snakes & Arrows represents the band’s 18th studio album. Produced by Nick Raskulinecz (Foo Fighters, Velvet Revolver, Superdrag), the record is another heavy guitar, bass, and drums…drums…and more drums record. The title came — unconsciously according to Peart — from a centuries-old Buddhist game of the same name about karma, and also from a play on the words of the children’s game Chutes and Ladders. Its subject matter is heavy duty: faith and war. From the opening track (and first single), acoustic and electric guitars, bass hum, and Peart’s crash-and-thrum urgency in the almighty riff are all present. When Geddy Lee opens his mouth, you know you are in for a ride: “Pariah dogs and wandering madmen/Barking at strangers and speaking in tongues/The ebb and flow of tidal fortune/Electrical charges are charging up the young/It’s a far cry from the world we thought we’d inherit/It’s a far cry from the way we thought we’d share it….” At the same time, inside the frame of the refrain, Lee refuses to be conquered in the face of chaos: “One day I feel like I’m ahead of the wheel/And the next it’s rolling over me/I can get back on/I can get back on.” Alex Lifeson’s guitars swell and Peart’s crash cymbals ride the riff and push Lee to sing above the wailing fray. Great beginning.
“Armor and Sword” contains an instrumental surprise. After an initial ride-cymbal clash, the guitar and bassline sound exactly like King Crimson playing something from Red or Larks’ Tongues in Aspic. The theme is repeated on an acoustic guitar before Lee begins singing about the shadowy side of human nature brought on by the many times children are scarred in development. The boom and crackle of electric guitars and bass are all there, but so is that sense of melody that Rush have trademarked as Lee states, “…No one gets to their heaven without a fight/We hold beliefs as a consolation/A way to take us out of ourselves….” There is no screed for or against religion per se, but a stake in the claim of hope and faith as absolutely necessary to accomplish anything, hence the refrain. Peart beautifully articulates the dark side of life’s undersurface; he has been writing the best lyrics of his entire career on the band’s last two studio records — only two in the last ten years. The dynamic works against the melody and Lifeson’s brief but screaming solo is a fine cap on it. “Workin’ Them Angels” blends the acoustic against the electrics gorgeously, and Lee sings counterpoint to the guitars. “The Larger Bowl” is one of those Rush tunes that builds and builds both lyrically and musically, beginning with only Lee’s voice and Lifeson’s acoustic guitar. Its shift-and-knot rhythms and spatial dynamics offer the impression — as does the rest of the album — that the bandmembers are playing in the same room at the same time (it happened to a lesser degree on Vapor Trails, but here the impression is constant). The sounds — both hard and soft — blend together wonderfully. The live feel of the record with its sonic washes and overdubbed guitars and vocals creates near chaos without loss of control. It’s like teetering on the edge of an abyss with one eye on both sides of it. Song by song, the notions of tension build, taking the listener to a place where hope and faith are challenged continually, not only in the face of the entire world, but in one’s personal relationships — check “Spindrift.” Echoes of T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, Robert Frost, Matthew Arnold, and The Odyssey are glanced upon, as is The Dhammapada in the Buddhist scriptures — with more of a thematic than referential purpose.
Amid all this seriousness, there is a bit of humor. The instrumental track “Malignant Narcissism” references a line in the comedic film Team America: World Police from Matt Stone and Trey Parker of South Park fame. It comes from a line in the film that reveals how terrorists think. It’s one of three absolutely stunning instrumentals; another is “The Main Monkey Business,” which sounds like the closest Rush have gotten to jamming in the studio in over 20 years. Think of the intensity of 2112 with the musicianship of Vapor Trails, and you begin to get a picture: screaming guitars, deep bass thrum, soaring keyboards, and all those pop-and-boom drums from Peart’s massive kit. “The Way the Wind Blows” is Rush taking on the blues in massive metallic style, and it feels more like Cream in the intro. Lee’s vocal drives deep inside the lyric — it’s tense, paranoid, yet revelatory. It’s about the perverse magnetism of religion and war, and how both are seemingly designed to be cause and effect: fanatical religiosity leads to war. There are different theories on this, but Peart distills them well, as if he’s read (but not necessarily completely understood) René Girard’s seminal work Violence and the Sacred. The album changes pace a bit with the instrumental “Hope,” a largely 12-string acoustic guitar piece played off a medieval theme by Lifeson. “Faithless” is anything but. It’s one of those Rush tracks where counterpoint vocals against the guitars and basslines create that unique welling of sound that occurs when the band is at its peak on-stage. The set ends with “We Hold On,” a track that expresses the sum total of all the struggles life offers and holds. Here Eliot the poet is quoted directly at the end of the third verse. It’s anthemic, with backmasked guitars, Peart playing actual breaks, and Lee’s bass holding the chaos together with a constant pulsing throb, guiding the various knotty musical changes back to the center of the verse and refrain, which is the place where the cut just explodes in sonic fury. Snakes & Arrows is one of the tightest conceptual records the band has ever released. Musically, it is as strong as their very best material, without a lapse in texture, composition, production, musicianship, or sheer rock intensity. There are real heart and fire in this album. It was well worth waiting for.
TRACKS:
All lyrics written by Neil Peart, all music composed by Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson, except “Hope” by Lifeson.
No.         Title       Length
1.            “Far Cry”              5:21
2.            “Armor and Sword”        6:36
3.            “Workin’ Them Angels”                 4:47
4.            “The Larger Bowl (A Pantoum)”                 4:07
5.            “Spindrift”           5:24
6.            “The Main Monkey Business”    6:01
7.            “The Way the Wind Blows”          6:28
8.            “Hope”                 2:03
9.            “Faithless”          5:31
10.          “Bravest Face”                  5:12
11.          “Good News First”          4:51
12.          “Malignant Narcissism”                 2:17
13.          “We Hold On”    4:13
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1 Comment

Filed under geddy lee, neil peart, Rush, Snakes and Arrows

One response to “Rush: Snakes & Arrows

  1. Excellent review, written with knowledge and passion. Look fed to more

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