Category Archives: 1966

Jimmy Ruffin: "What Becomes of the Broken Hearted"

ON THIS DATE (46 YEARS AGO)
June 3, 1966 – Jimmy Ruffin: “What Becomes of the Broken Hearted” b/w “Baby I’ve Got It” (Soul S-35022) 45 single is released in the US.
“What Becomes of the Brokenhearted” is a hit single recorded by Jimmy Ruffin and released on Motown Records’ Soul label in the summer of 1966. It is a ballad, with lead singer Jimmy Ruffin recalling the pain that befalls the brokenhearted, and their struggle to overcome their sadness so that they can find happiness in the future of their lives. In 1996, Robson and Jerome covered the song and topped the UK singles chart with it.
The song was written by William Weatherspoon, Paul Riser, and James Dean, and the recording was produced by Witherspoon and William “Mickey” Stevenson. “What Becomes of the Brokenhearted” was Jimmy Ruffin’s only Top 10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100, and remains one of the most-revived of Motown’s hits.
Composers Witherspoon and Riser and lyricist Dean had originally written “What Becomes of the Brokenhearted” with the intention of having The Spinners, then an act on Motown’s V.I.P. label, record the tune. Jimmy Ruffin, older brother of Temptations lead singer David Ruffin, persuaded Dean to let him record the song, as its anguished lyric about a man lost in the misery of heartbreak resonated with the singer.
Ruffin’s lead vocal on the recording is augmented by the instrumentation of Motown’s on-house studio band, The Funk Brothers, and the joint backing vocals of Motown session singers The Originals and The Andantes. “What Becomes of the Brokenhearted” peaked at number seven on the Billboard Hot 100, and at number six on the Billboard R&B Singles chart.
The song originally featured a spoken introduction by Ruffin, similar in style to many Lou Rawls’s performances of the same time. The spoken verse was removed from the final mix, hence the unusually long instrumental intro on the released version. The spoken verse is present on the alternate mix from the UK 2003 release “Jimmy Ruffin – The Ultimate Motown Collection” and as a new stereo extended mix on the 2005 anthology “The Motown Box”:
A world filled with love is a wonderful sight.
Being in love is one’s heart’s delight.
But that look of love isn’t on my face.
That enchanted feeling has been replaced.

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Filed under 1966, Jimmy Ruffin, motown, What Becomes of the Broken Hearted

The Beatles: “Paperback Writer” b/w “Rain”

ON THIS DATE (46 YEARS AGO)
May 30, 1966 – The Beatles: “Paperback Writer” b/w “Rain” (Capitol 5651) 45 single is released in the US.
PAPERBACK WRITER
“Paperback Writer” is a 1966 song by The Beatles. Written by Paul McCartney and credited to Lennon–McCartney, the song was released as the A-side of their eleventh single. The single went to the number one spot in the United States, United Kingdom, West Germany, Australia, New Zealand and Norway. On the US Billboard Hot 100, the song was at number one for two non-consecutive weeks, being interrupted by Frank Sinatra’s “Strangers in the Night”.  “Paperback Writer” was the last new song by the Beatles to be featured on their final tour in 1966, and was the group’s only U.S. number one released that year.
According to disc jockey Jimmy Savile, McCartney wrote the song in response to a request from an aunt who asked if he could “write a single that wasn’t about love.” Savile said, “With that thought obviously still in his mind, he walked around the room and noticed that Ringo was reading a book. He took one look and announced that he would write a song about a book.” In a 2007 interview, McCartney recalled that he wrote the song after reading in the Daily Mail about an aspiring author, possibly Martin Amis. The Daily Mail was Lennon’s regular newspaper and copies were in Lennon’s Weybridge home when Lennon and McCartney were writing songs.

The song’s lyrics are in the form of a letter from an aspiring author addressed to a publisher. The author badly needs a job and has written a paperback version of a book by a “man named Lear.” This is a reference to the Victorian painter Edward Lear, who wrote nonsense poems and songs of which Lennon was very fond (though Lear never wrote novels).
RAIN
“Rain” is a song by the The Beatles, written by John Lennon  but credited to Lennon–McCartney. It was first released in June 1966 as the B-side of the “Paperback Writer” single. Both songs were recorded during the sessions for Revolver but neither appears on that album. “Rain” has been called The Beatles’ finest B-side, especially notable for its heavy sonic presence and backwards vocals, both of which were a hint of things to come on Revolver, released two months later.
PROMOTIONAL FILMS
Michael Lindsay-Hogg directed four promotional films for the song shot on 19 and 20 May 1966. On the first day they recorded a colour performance at Abbey Road, for The Ed Sullivan Show, which was shown on 5 June, and two black and white performance clips for British television. These were shown on Ready Steady Go! and Thank Your Lucky Stars on 3 June and 25 June, respectively.
On 20 May, another colour film was made at Chiswick House in west London. The Beatles mimed to the song, and they were shown in and around the conservatory in the grounds of the house. The clip was first broadcast in black and white on BBC-TV’s Top of the Pops on 2 June. The Beatles made their only live appearance on Top of the Pops to mime to “Paperback Writer” and “Rain”. They were introduced by DJ Pete Murray. This session is famous for being wiped by the BBC when they were cleaning tapes for re-use. The session showed how difficult it was for the Beatles to even mime to their later material – they had difficulty in taking their performance seriously.

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Filed under 1966, george harrison, john lennon, Paperback Writer, Paul McCartney, Rain, Revolver, ringo starr, The Beatles

Marvin Gaye: Moods of Marvin Gaye

ON THIS DATE (46 YEARS AGO)
May 23, 1966 – Marvin Gaye: Moods of Marvin Gaye is released.
# ALL THINGS MUSIC PLUS+ 4.5/5
# Allmusic 4/5 stars
Moods of Marvin Gaye is an album by Marvin Gaye released on this date in 1966 on Tamla.  Six songs from Moods of Marvin Gaye were released as singles: impressively, all reached the Top 40 on the R&B singles chart and four of them reached the Top 40 on the Pop Singles Chart, a rare feat for a solo R&B artist even at that time. Gaye also scored his first two #1 R&B singles, “I’ll Be Doggone” and “Ain’t That Peculiar”, both co-written by Gaye’s friend, Berry Gordy’s right-hand man Smokey Robinson.
The album’s plan was to establish the singer as a strong albums-oriented artist, as well as a hit maker, although Gaye was still uncomfortable with performing strictly R&B. He had begun work on a standards album around this time after meeting musician Bobby Scott. However, sessions were unsuccessful. As a matter of fact, Gaye would successfully complete a standards album only in his later years, an album which would be released after his death. For the time being, Gaye was winning more fans and had become a crossover teen idol.
REVIEW
by John Bush, allmusic
After Marvin Gaye recorded tributes to Broadway and Nat King Cole in the previous two years, Motown fans may have had their suspicions raised by an LP titled Moods of Marvin Gaye. Yes, there are a few supper-club standards to be found here, but Gaye moves smoothly between good-time soul and adult pop. Most important are his first two R&B number ones, “I’ll Be Doggone” and “Ain’t That Particular,” both from 1965 and both produced by Smokey Robinson. Berry Gordy’s right-hand man also helmed “Take This Heart of Mine” and “One More Heartache,” another pair of big R&B scores, and just as good as the better-known hits. As for the copyrights not owned by Jobete, the chestnut “One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)” certainly didn’t need another reading, but Gaye’s take on Willie Nelson’s after-hours classic “Night Life” was inspired. Marvin Gaye was improving with every record, gaining in character and strength of performance, and Moods of Marvin Gaye is a radically better record than its predecessors.
TRACKS:
Side one                                             
1              I’ll Be Doggone (W. Moore, S. Robinson, M. Tarplin) 2:47
2              Little Darling (I Need You) (Holland-Dozier-Holland) 2:35
3              Take This Heart of Mine (Moore, Robinson, Tarplin) 2:49
4              Hey Diddle Diddle (Johnny Bristol, Harvey Fuqua, Gaye) 2:30
5              One More Heartache (Moore, Robinson, Rogers, Tarplin) 2:42
6              Ain’t That Peculiar (Moore, Robinson, Rogers, Tarplin) 3:00
                                               
Side two                                             
7              Night Life (Walt Breeland, Paul Buskirk, Willie Nelson) 3:05
8              You’ve Been a Long Time Coming 2:13
9              Your Unchanging Love (Holland-Dozier-Holland) 3:13
10           You’re the One For Me (M. Broadnax, C.Paul, S.Wonder) 3:24
11           I Worry ‘Bout You (Norman Mapp) 3:24
12           One for My Baby (and One More for the Road) (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) 4:30

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Filed under 1966, marvin gaye, Moods of Marvin Gaye, motown, Tamla